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March 23, 2019 

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FDIC: The abbreviation for Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, which is a program established by Congress in 1933, during the worst of the Great Depression, to insure the deposits of failed banks. The FDIC operates much like any private insurance company. It collects insurance premiums from its customers--the banks--in return for the assurance that it will stand behind, or be ready to pay off, any deposits that the banks can't.

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BANK RESERVES: The "money" that banks use to conduct day-to-day business, including cashing checks, satisfying customers's withdrawals, and clearing checks between accounts at different banks. The "money" in question includes vault cash and Federal Reserve deposits. Specifically, vault cash is the paper money and coins that a bank keeps on the bank premises (both in the vault and in teller drawers), which is used to "cash" checks and otherwise provide the funds that customers withdraw. Federal Reserve deposits are accounts that banks keep with the Federal Reserve System, which are used to process, in a systematic, centralized fashion, the millions of checks written each day by customers of one bank that are deposited by customers of another bank. Using these deposits, the Fed acts as a central clearing house for checks, being able to simultaneously debit the account of one bank and credit the account of another. More on the importance of bank reserves can be found under fractional-reserve banking.

     See also | bank | money | vault cash | Federal Reserve deposits | Federal Reserve System | credit | fractional-reserve banking | required reserves | legal reserves | excess reserves |


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BANK RESERVES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: March 23, 2019].


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MARGINAL REVENUE PRODUCT AND FACTOR DEMAND

A perfectly competitive firm's factor demand curve is that negatively-sloped portion of its marginal revenue product curve. A perfectly competitive firm maximizes profit by hiring the quantity of input that equates factor price and marginal revenue product. As such, the firm moves along its negatively-sloped marginal revenue product curve in response to changing factor prices.

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