Google
Sunday 
January 21, 2018 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
LONG-RUN AVERAGE COST CURVE: A curve depicting the per unit cost of producing a good or service in the long run when all inputs are variable. The long-run average cost curve (usually abbreviated LRAC) can be derived in two ways. On is to plot long-run average cost, which is, long-run total cost divided by the quantity of output produced. at different output levels. The more common method, however, is as an envelope of an infinite number of short-run average total cost curves. Such an envelope is base on identifying the point on each short-run average total cost curve that provides the lowest possible average cost for each quantity of output. The long-run average cost curve is U-shaped, reflecting economies of scale (or increasing returns to scale) when negatively-sloped and diseconomies of scale (or decreasing returns to scale) when positively sloped. The minimum point (or range) on the LRAC curve is the minimum efficient scale.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

URBANIZATION ECONOMIES: A reduction in production cost the results when diverse activities are located in a concentrated urban area. Urbanization economies applied to all types of activities that benefit from assorted urban "amenities" such as public utilities, government services, information services that are inclined to experience decreasing average cost with large scale production. If, for example, a city has sufficient demand for a more efficiency, larger scale electrical generation plant, then everyone can benefit from lower electricity rates.

     See also | agglomeration | transportation | competition along a line | weight | weight gaining | weight losing | location theory | attractive force | agglomeration economies | urban economics |


Recommended Citation:

URBANIZATION ECONOMIES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: January 21, 2018].


Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

MARGINAL COST AND LAW OF DIMINISHING MARGINAL RETURNS

Decreasing then increasing marginal cost, reflected by a U-shaped marginal cost curve, is the result of increasing then decreasing marginal returns. In particular the decreasing marginal returns is caused by the law of diminishing marginal returns. As such, the law of diminishing marginal returns affects not only the short-run production of a firm but also the cost of short-run production. This translates into a positively-sloped supply curve for profit-maximizing competitive firms.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

PINK FADFLY
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at the confiscated property police auction seeking to buy either blue cotton balls or a genuine down-filled pillow. Be on the lookout for celebrities who speak directly to you through your television.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

Approximately three-fourths of the U.S. paper currency in circular contains traces of cocaine.
"The more you praise and celebrate your life, the more there is in life to celebrate."

-- Oprah Winfrey

MFN
Most-Favoured Nation
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2018 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster