Google
Tuesday 
September 2, 2014 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
Today's Index
Yesterday's Index
211.9

Help us compile the AmosWEB Free Lunch Index. Tell us about your last lunch.

Skipped lunch altogether.
Bought by another.
Ate lunch at home.
Brought lunch from home.
Fast food drive through.
Fast food dine in.
All-you-can eat buffet.
Casual dining with tip.
Fancy upscale with tip.

More About the Index
Least favorite sport?

Football.
Basketball.
Baseball.
Tennis.
Golf.
Soccer.

GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT AND NET DOMESTIC PRODUCT: Gross domestic product (GDP) is the total market value of all final goods and services produced within the political boundaries of an economy during a given period of time, usually a year. Net domestic product (NDP) is the total market value of all final goods and services produced within the political boundaries of an economy during a given period of time, usually a year, after adjusting for the depreciation of capital. The key difference between these two production measures is the phrase "after adjusting for the depreciation of capital." This phrase is officially termed capital consumption adjustment.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number)Worth a Look Visit the WEB*pedia

TRANSPORTATION: The movement of a good, resource, or commodity from one location to another. This is one of two primary types of production activity, the other being the physical transformation of a good. Transportation invariably involves significant amounts of capital goods, which makes it an industry prone toward either oligopoly or monopoly. In fact, many major oligopoly and monopoly industries are heavily involved with transportation. Public utility monopolies top the list (electricity and natural gas distribution). Oligopoly examples include airlines, railroads, long distance telephone, and television broadcasting.

     See also | production | capital | oligopoly | monopoly | market structure | public utility |


Recommended Citation:

TRANSPORTATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: September 2, 2014].


Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

INTERMEDIATE GOODS

Goods (and services) that are used as inputs or components in the production of other goods. Intermediate goods are combined into the production of finished products, or what are termed final goods. Unlike final goods, intermediate goods will be further processed before sold as final goods. Because gross domestic product seeks to measure the market value of final goods, and because the value of intermediate goods are included in the value of final goods, market transactions that capture the value of intermediate goods are not included separately in gross domestic product. To do so creates the problem of double counting.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia



State of the ECONOMY

Sales of New Single-Family Homes
May 2014
504,000 (seasonal adjusted annual rate)
Up 18.6% from April 2014

More Stats

PURPLE SMARPHIN
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time visiting every yard sale in a 30-mile radius seeking to buy either a decorative windchime with plastic or a flower arrangement for that special day for your mother. Be on the lookout for neighborhood pets, especially belligerent parrots.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

The portrait on the quarter is a more accurate likeness of George Washington than that on the dollar bill.
"The shifts of fortune test the reliability of friends. "

-- Marcus Tullius Cicero, Roman statesman

MU
Marginal Utility
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2014 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster