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October 24, 2014 

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OLIGOPOLY: A market structure dominated by a small number of large firms, selling either identical or differentiated products, and significant barriers to entry into the industry. This is one of four basic market structures. The other three are perfect competition, monopoly, and monopolistic competition.

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TRANSPORTATION: The movement of a good, resource, or commodity from one location to another. This is one of two primary types of production activity, the other being the physical transformation of a good. Transportation invariably involves significant amounts of capital goods, which makes it an industry prone toward either oligopoly or monopoly. In fact, many major oligopoly and monopoly industries are heavily involved with transportation. Public utility monopolies top the list (electricity and natural gas distribution). Oligopoly examples include airlines, railroads, long distance telephone, and television broadcasting.

     See also | production | capital | oligopoly | monopoly | market structure | public utility |


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TRANSPORTATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: October 24, 2014].


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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES LINE

A graphical depiction of the relation between aggregate expenditures by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) and the level of aggregate income or production. In Keynesian economics, the aggregate expenditures line is the essential component of the Keynesian cross analysis used to identify equilibrium income and production. Like any straight line, the aggregate expenditures line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous expenditures, and slope, which indicates induced expenditures. The aggregate expenditures line used in Keynesian economics is derived by adding or stacking investment, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

U.S. National Debt
September 28, 2014
$17,747,407,384,231.36
$55,616.47 per person: U.S. Debt Clock

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BLUE PLACIDOLA
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for the new strip mall out on the highway hoping to buy either a coffee cup commemorating last Friday (you know why) or a wall poster commemorating the first day of spring. Be on the lookout for slow moving vehicles with darkened windows.
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This isn't me! What am I?

North Carolina supplied all the domestic gold coined for currency by the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia until 1828.
"Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do. "

-- John Wooden, basketball coach

ACCR
Annual Cost of Capital Recovery
A PEDestrian's Guide
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