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May 7, 2015 

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VARIABLE COST: In general, cost that changes with changes in the quantity of output produced. More specifically, variable cost is combined with the adjectives "total" and "average" to indicate the overall level of variable cost or the per unit variable cost. Variable cost depends on the amount of produced. If there is no production, then there is no variable cost.

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TRANSPORTATION: The movement of a good, resource, or commodity from one location to another. This is one of two primary types of production activity, the other being the physical transformation of a good. Transportation invariably involves significant amounts of capital goods, which makes it an industry prone toward either oligopoly or monopoly. In fact, many major oligopoly and monopoly industries are heavily involved with transportation. Public utility monopolies top the list (electricity and natural gas distribution). Oligopoly examples include airlines, railroads, long distance telephone, and television broadcasting.

     See also | production | capital | oligopoly | monopoly | market structure | public utility |


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TRANSPORTATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2015. [Accessed: May 7, 2015].


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ASSUMPTIONS, CLASSICAL ECONOMICS

Classical economics, especially as directed toward macroeconomics, relies on three key assumptions--flexible prices, Say's law, and saving-investment equality. Flexible prices ensure that markets adjust to equilibrium and eliminate shortages and surpluses. Say's law states that supply creates its own demand and means that enough income is generated by production to purchase the resulting production. The saving-investment equality ensures that any income leaked from consumption into saving is replaced by an equal amount of investment. Although of questionable realism, these three assumptions imply that the economy would operate at full employment.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Unemployment
March 2015
5.5% Steady
Bureau of Labor Statistics

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BLACK DISMALAPOD
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a dollar discount store seeking to buy either a hepa filter for your furnace or a wall poster commemorating next Thursday. Be on the lookout for a thesaurus filled with typos.
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