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March 25, 2017 

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FOR WHOM?: One of three basic questions of allocation (What? and How? are the other two). Answering the "For Whom?" question of allocation determines who receives the goods that society produces with limited resources. Answering the "For Whom" question involves related questions such as, should goods be distributed to people according to incomes and ability to buy (contributive standard), wants and needs (needs standard), political affiliation, or some other criterion (perhaps equality standard)?

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TRANSPORTATION: The movement of a good, resource, or commodity from one location to another. This is one of two primary types of production activity, the other being the physical transformation of a good. Transportation invariably involves significant amounts of capital goods, which makes it an industry prone toward either oligopoly or monopoly. In fact, many major oligopoly and monopoly industries are heavily involved with transportation. Public utility monopolies top the list (electricity and natural gas distribution). Oligopoly examples include airlines, railroads, long distance telephone, and television broadcasting.

     See also | production | capital | oligopoly | monopoly | market structure | public utility |


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TRANSPORTATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2017. [Accessed: March 25, 2017].


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AUTONOMOUS INVESTMENT

Business investment expenditures that do not depend on income or production (especially national income or even gross domestic product). That is, changes in income do not generate changes in investment. Autonomous investment is best thought of as investment that the business sector undertakes regardless of the state of the economy. It is measured by the intercept term of the investment line. The alternative to autonomous investment is induced investment, which does depend on income.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Business Inventories
October 2016
$1,814.5 billion
Up 2% from Oct. 2015: Econ. Stat. Admin.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time going from convenience store to convenience store seeking to buy either a half-dozen helium filled balloons or a packet of address labels large enough for addresses of both the sender and the recipient. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from former employers.
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Two and a half gallons of oil are needed to produce one automobile tire.
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