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July 28, 2014 

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BROKER: Anyone who is paid to bring together buyers and sellers to complete a market transaction. Common examples of brokers are real estate agents, stock brokers, and insurance agents. The thing to note about brokers is that they don't buy or sell anything, but merely bring buyers and sellers together. This little function is different from that of a dealer. A dealer is one who is always ready to help a transaction by selling to those who are buying or buying from those who are selling. As such, while stock brokers are in fact brokers, matching up buyers and sellers, many are also dealers, ready to buy or sell if no one else does.

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TRANSPORTATION: The movement of a good, resource, or commodity from one location to another. This is one of two primary types of production activity, the other being the physical transformation of a good. Transportation invariably involves significant amounts of capital goods, which makes it an industry prone toward either oligopoly or monopoly. In fact, many major oligopoly and monopoly industries are heavily involved with transportation. Public utility monopolies top the list (electricity and natural gas distribution). Oligopoly examples include airlines, railroads, long distance telephone, and television broadcasting.

     See also | production | capital | oligopoly | monopoly | market structure | public utility |


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TRANSPORTATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: July 28, 2014].


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INFLATIONARY EXPECTATIONS, AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES DETERMINANT

One of several specific aggregate expenditures determinants assumed constant when the aggregate expenditures line is constructed, and that shifts the aggregate expenditures line when it changes. An increase in inflationary expectations causes an increase (upward shift) of the aggregate expenditures line. A decrease in inflationary expectations causes a decrease (downward shift) of the aggregate expenditures line. Other notable aggregate expenditures determinants include interest rates, federal deficit, consumer confidence, and exchange rates.

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State of the ECONOMY

Employer Cost for Employee Compensation
March 2014
$31.93 per hour
Benefits are $9.97 / hour Source: BLS

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BEIGE MUNDORTLE
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for the new strip mall out on the highway trying to buy either a rim for your spare tire or decorative celebrity figurines. Be on the lookout for slow moving vehicles with darkened windows.
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It's estimated that the U.S. economy has about $20 million of counterfeit currency in circulation, less than 0.001 perecent of the total legal currency.
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