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December 4, 2016 

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ZERO COUPON BOND: Also termed a zero bond, a bond that does not pay interest, in which the return is generated by the difference between the purchase price and the face value paid at maturity. Because they do not pay interest, zero coupon bonds are sold at a discount. For example, a $10,000 zero coupon bond that matures in one year, would generate a 10% return if it sold at a discount of $9,000.

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TRANSPORTATION: The movement of a good, resource, or commodity from one location to another. This is one of two primary types of production activity, the other being the physical transformation of a good. Transportation invariably involves significant amounts of capital goods, which makes it an industry prone toward either oligopoly or monopoly. In fact, many major oligopoly and monopoly industries are heavily involved with transportation. Public utility monopolies top the list (electricity and natural gas distribution). Oligopoly examples include airlines, railroads, long distance telephone, and television broadcasting.

     See also | production | capital | oligopoly | monopoly | market structure | public utility |


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TRANSPORTATION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2016. [Accessed: December 4, 2016].


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ASYMMETRIC INFORMATION

Information is not equally available to everyone. Asymmetric information results because efficient information search inevitably stops short of compete information. Some people obtain more benefits from information than others, are willing to incur higher search costs, and thus end up knowing more. Or they incur lower information search costs and have easier access to the information. In a market, sellers tend to have more information about the good than buyers. Asymmetric information gives rise to adverse selection, moral hazard, and the principal-agent problem. These problems can be lessened through signalling and screening.

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APLS

State of the ECONOMY

Consumer Price Index Urban
November 2015
237.336
Up 0.0% from Oct. 2015 Source: BLS

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BROWN PRAGMATOX
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the downtown area seeking to buy either a green fountain pen or a handcrafted bird house. Be on the lookout for empty parking spaces that appear to be near the entrance to a store.
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The 1909 Lincoln penny was the first U.S. coin with the likeness of a U.S. President.
"Wise men speak because they have something to say; Fools because they have to say something. "

-- Plato, philosopher

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