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September 22, 2018 

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FALLACY: A logical error in an argument or evaluation of a policy. The six common fallacies that surface in economic analysis are: false cause, personal attack, division, composition, false authority, and mass appeal. These fallacies are most troublesome because, although false, they seem correct, especially when used by a slick-talking, charismatic person (politician) or when the fallacies support a preconceived notion or fundamental belief.

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WEALTH DISTRIBUTION: The manner in which wealth is divided among the members of the economy. A perfectly equal wealth distribution would mean everyone in the country has exactly the same wealth. In reality, wealth is unequally distributed. A few people have a great deal of wealth and most others have less. Any well-functioning economy, that's doing a pretty good job of satisfying consumer wants and needs, will have some degree of inequality in the distribution of wealth. This occurs because some people have done a good job of producing what people want, and thus grow wealthy. However, wealth tends to perpetuate itself, over and above what may be justified by valuable production. Along with wealth comes market control, political power, and the ability to accumulate more wealth at the expense of others.

     See also | wealth | income distribution | Gini index | production | market control | third rule of inequality | wealth pyramid |


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PARADOX OF THRIFT

The notion that an increase in saving, which is generally good advice for an individual during bad economic times, can actually worsen the macroeconomy causing a reduction in aggregate income, production, and paradoxically a decrease in saving. The paradox of thrift is an example of the fallacy of composition stating that what is true for the part is not necessarily true for the whole.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a crowded estate auction trying to buy either a small palm tree that will fit on your coffee table or several magazines on fashion design. Be on the lookout for broken fingernail clippers.
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In 1914, Ford paid workers who were age 22 or older $5 per day -- double the average wage offered by other car factories.
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