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AGGREGATE DEMAND: The total (or aggregate) real expenditures on final goods and services produced in the domestic economy that buyers would willing and able to make at different price levels, during a given time period (usually a year). Aggregate demand (AD) is one half of the aggregate market analysis; the other half is aggregate supply. Aggregate demand, relates the economy's price level, measured by the GDP price deflator, and aggregate expenditures on domestic production, measured by real gross domestic product. The aggregate expenditures are consumption, investment, government purchases, and net exports made by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign).

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MARKET CONTROL: The ability of buyers or sellers to exert influence over the price or quantity of a good, service, or commodity exchanged in a market. Market control depends on the number of competitors. If a market has relatively few buyers, but a bunch of sellers, then the buyers tend to have relatively more market control than sellers. The converse occurs if there are a bunch of buyers, but relatively few sellers. If the market is controlled on the supply side by one seller, we have a monopoly, and if it is controlled on the demand side by one buyer, we have a monopsony. Most markets are subject to some degree of control.

     See also | market | price | market structure | monopoly | monopsony | competitive market | fourth rule of competition | price taker | price maker | competitive market |


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INVESTMENT LINE

A graphical depiction of the relation between investment expenditures by the business sector and the economy's aggregate level of income or production. This relation plays a key role in the study of Keynesian economics. A investment line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous investment, and slope, which is the marginal propensity to invest and indicates induced investment. The aggregate expenditures line used in Keynesian economics is derived by adding or stacking the investment line onto the consumption line, then adding government purchases and net exports to this stack.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time visiting every yard sale in a 30-mile radius seeking to buy either a birthday greeting card for your uncle or a T-shirt commemorating the 2000 Presidential election. Be on the lookout for crowded shopping malls.
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One of the largest markets for gold in the United States is the manufacturing of class rings.
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