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LEISURE: The portion of time workers and other people spend not being compensative for work performed when they actively engaged in the production of goods and services. In other words, this is the time people sent off the job. Leisure activities can include resting at home, working around the house (without compensation), engaging in leisure activities (such as weekend sports, watching movies), or even sleeping. Leisure time pursuits becomes increasingly important for economies as they become more highly developed. As technological advances reduce the amount of time people need to spend working to generate a given level of income, they have more freedom to pursue leisure activities. Not only does this promote sales of industries that provide leisure related goods (sports, entertainment, etc.) it also triggers an interesting labor-leisure tradeoff and what is termed the backward-bending labor supply curve.

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MARKET CONTROL: The ability of buyers or sellers to exert influence over the price or quantity of a good, service, or commodity exchanged in a market. Market control depends on the number of competitors. If a market has relatively few buyers, but a bunch of sellers, then the buyers tend to have relatively more market control than sellers. The converse occurs if there are a bunch of buyers, but relatively few sellers. If the market is controlled on the supply side by one seller, we have a monopoly, and if it is controlled on the demand side by one buyer, we have a monopsony. Most markets are subject to some degree of control.

     See also | market | price | market structure | monopoly | monopsony | competitive market | fourth rule of competition | price taker | price maker | competitive market |


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MARGINAL FACTOR COST CURVE

A curve that graphically represents the relation between marginal factor cost incurred by a firm for hiring an input and the quantity of input employed. A profit-maximizing firm hires the quantity of input found at the intersection of the marginal factor cost curve and marginal revenue product curve. The marginal factor cost curve for a firm with no market control is horizontal. The marginal factor cost curve for a firm with market control is positively sloped and lies above the average factor cost curve.

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BROWN PRAGMATOX
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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time watching infomercials wanting to buy either a wall poster commemorating Thor Heyerdahl's Pacific crossing aboard the Kon-Tiki or decorative garden figurines. Be on the lookout for attractive cable television service repair people.
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Junk bonds are so called because they have a better than 50% chance of default, carrying a Standard & Poor's rating of CC or lower.
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