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AGGREGATE SUPPLY DETERMINANTS: An assortment of ceteris paribus factors that affect both short-run aggregate supply and long-run aggregate supply, but which are assumed constant when the short-run and long-run aggregate supply curves are constructed. Changes in any of the aggregate supply determinants cause the short-run and long-run aggregate supply curves to shift. While a wide variety of specific ceteris paribus factors can cause the aggregate supply curves to shift, it's usually most convenient to group them into three broad categories -- resource quantity, resource quality, and resource prices.

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THIRD RULE OF INEQUALITY: The third of seven basic rules of the economy. It is a fact of life that resources, income, and wealth are not equally distributed. Some people have more and some people have less. Why is this so? We can look to the age-old distinction between nature and nurture for insight. On the nature side, some people are born with more talents, abilities and intelligence than others, which they use to gain ownership and control of income-generating and wealth-producing resources. On the nurture side, some people work harder to develop skills, acquire education, and uncover opportunities that lead to ownership and control of income-generating and wealth-producing resources (human capital).

     See also | seven rules | resources | income | wealth | income distribution | wealth distribution | ownership and control | equity | education | human capital |


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POLITICAL BUSINESS CYCLES

The notion that business cycles are caused by elected government leaders who manipulate the economy to achieve personal political goals, that is, to be re-elected and remain in office. The leaders stimulate the economy leading up to an election, creating a business-cycle expansion that ensures (they hope) re-election, they then induce a business-cycle contraction after the election to correct problems created by the pre-election stimulation. This explanation suggests that government is the source of business cycles are should not be allowed to implement discretionary stabilization policies.

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