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DEPOSIT INSURANCE: A program of guaranteeing, or insuring, customers' deposits at a bank or similar institution. Since the 1930s bank deposits have been insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). Other programs have insured deposits at credit unions and savings and loan associations. The FDIC works like this -- If a bank is unable to pay back all or part of its customers' deposits because it has done something like go out of business, then the FDIC steps in to make up the difference--up to a pretty hefty limit.

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THIRD RULE OF INEQUALITY: The third of seven basic rules of the economy. It is a fact of life that resources, income, and wealth are not equally distributed. Some people have more and some people have less. Why is this so? We can look to the age-old distinction between nature and nurture for insight. On the nature side, some people are born with more talents, abilities and intelligence than others, which they use to gain ownership and control of income-generating and wealth-producing resources. On the nurture side, some people work harder to develop skills, acquire education, and uncover opportunities that lead to ownership and control of income-generating and wealth-producing resources (human capital).

     See also | seven rules | resources | income | wealth | income distribution | wealth distribution | ownership and control | equity | education | human capital |


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THIRD RULE OF INEQUALITY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: January 21, 2019].


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AGGREGATE MARKET SHOCKS

Disruptions of the equilibrium in the aggregate market (or AS-AD model) caused by shifts of the aggregate demand, short-run aggregate supply, or long-run aggregate supply curves. Shocks of the aggregate market are associated with, and thus used to analyze, assorted macroeconomic phenomena such as business cycles, unemployment, inflation, stabilization policies, and economic growth. The specific analysis of aggregate market shocks identifies changes in the price level (GDP price deflator) and real production (real GDP). Changes in the price level and real production have direct implications for the unemployment rate, the inflation rate, national income, and a host of other macroeconomic measures.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at the confiscated property police auction trying to buy either a 200-foot blue garden hose or a video camera with stop action features. Be on the lookout for deranged pelicans.
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Helping spur the U.S. industrial revolution, Thomas Edison patented nearly 1300 inventions, 300 of which came out of his Menlo Park "invention factory" during a four-year period.
"The more you praise and celebrate your life, the more there is in life to celebrate."

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