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September 25, 2022 

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THIRD ESTATE: In past centuries, this included the peasants, serfs, or slaves who performed the dirty deeds for the ruling elite. In modern times, this is the workers, taxpayers, and consumers who have limited ownership of and control over resources usually nothing more than their own labor. The third estate, which forms the backbone of any modern economy, is usually at odds with the business leaders of the second estate. Help may come from the government leaders of the first estate or the journalist of the fourth estate--but don't count on it.

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AVERAGE PROPENSITY TO CONSUME: The proportion of income, usually measured as disposable income or national income, used for household consumption expenditures. It is found by dividing consumption by income. The average propensity to consume, abbreviated APC, most often pops up in discussions of Keynesian economics. The average propensity to consume is the average amount of total household income that is devoted consumption expenditures. For closely related information see marginal propensity to consume, average propensity to save, marginal propensity to save, and consumption function.

     See also | disposable income | national income | consumption expenditures | household sector | Keynesian economics | marginal propensity to consume | average propensity to save | marginal propensity to save | consumption function | consumption line | Keynesian economics | circular flow |


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AVERAGE PROPENSITY TO CONSUME, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: September 25, 2022].


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POLITICAL ENTREPRENEURS

Election seeking politicians who undertake risks inherent in the allocation of resources made through government actions. Like business entrepreneurs, political entrepreneurs take risks and organize production. They organize production with government laws, regulations, and policies. They run the risk of failed policies and losing elections. Their utility-maximizing actions are also a prime source of government failure. Falling victim to the principal-agent problem, pursuit of their own satisfaction (winning elections) often conflicts with what is best for the rest of society.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time waiting for visits from door-to-door solicitors wanting to buy either an AC adapter for your CD player or storage boxes for your family photos. Be on the lookout for the happiest person in the room.
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Before 1933, the U.S. dime was legal as payment only in transactions of $10 or less.
"If I'm selecting a group, the first thing I look for is a record of achievement . . . If (candidates achieve) in small things, there's a very good chance they'll perform well in big things. "

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