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January 17, 2018 

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DUAL LABOR MARKET: A proposition that our economy has two classes of workers -- (1) adult white males and (2) other. The other includes, but isn't limited to, women, blacks, hispanics, and teenagers. Based on the political and economic clout of whites and the traditional notion of men as the "bread winners" of a family, white males constitute the primary labor supply and thus get the best, highest paying jobs, with the greatest chance of advancement--like executive, physician, shop foreman, or U. S. Senator. The other groups, however, are left with secondary jobs--such as secretary, janitor, nurse, or convenience store clerk--that have very low pay and limited prospects to move up. Moreover, there tends to be little movement between these two labor markets.

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MARGINAL PROPENSITY TO SAVE: The proportion of each additional dollar of household income that is used for saving. Or alternatively, this is the change in saving due to a change in disposable income. Abbreviated MPS, the marginal propensity to save is the slope of the saving or propensity-to-save line. It also takes center stage for the multiplier effect. In particular, the inverse of the MPS is the simple expenditure multiplier. The sum of the marginal propensity to save and the related concept, the marginal propensity to consume, is equal to one.

     See also | saving | disposable income | saving line | Keynesian economics | multiplier | marginal propensity to consume | marginal propensity to import | marginal propensity to invest |


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IMPORTS LINE

A graphical depiction of the relation between imports bought from the foreign sector and the domestic economy's aggregate level of income or production. This relation is most important for deriving the net exports line, which plays a minor, but growing role in the study of Keynesian economics. An imports line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous imports, and slope, which is the marginal propensity to import and indicates induced imports. The aggregate expenditures line used in Keynesian economics is derived by adding or stacking the net exports line, derived as the difference between the exports line and imports line, onto the consumption line, after adding investment expenditures and government purchases.

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