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April 13, 2021 

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SHORT-RUN AGGREGATE SUPPLY AND MARKET SUPPLY: The short-run aggregate supply curve, or SRAS curve, has similarities to, but differences from, the standard market supply curve. Both are positively sloped. Both relate price and quantity. However, the market supply curve is positively sloped due to the law of diminishing marginal returns and the short-run aggregate supply curve is positively-sloped due to inflexible prices, the pool of natural unemployment, and imbalances in real resource prices.

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MULTIPLIER: The cumulatively reinforcing interaction between consumption and production that amplifies changes in investment, government spending, or exports. In other words, if businesses decide to increase investment expenditures on capital goods or if government decides to expand the size of the already bloated federal deficit by spending more on national defense, then our economy's production and income are likely to increase by some multiple of this spending. The amplified increase in production and income, usually from 2 to 5 times, is what gives us the term "multiplier." The process is based on the circular flow idea the people receive income by producing goods and then spend this income on additional production.

     See also | consumption | production | investment | government purchases | net exports | income | circular flow | Keynesian economics | business cycle | gross domestic product | expansion | contraction | recovery |


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ASYMMETRIC INFORMATION

Information is not equally available to everyone. Asymmetric information results because efficient information search inevitably stops short of compete information. Some people obtain more benefits from information than others, are willing to incur higher search costs, and thus end up knowing more. Or they incur lower information search costs and have easier access to the information. In a market, sellers tend to have more information about the good than buyers. Asymmetric information gives rise to adverse selection, moral hazard, and the principal-agent problem. These problems can be lessened through signalling and screening.

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