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BANK FAILURE: In principle, this results when a bank's liabilities exceed assets for an extended period and the bank is forced to go out of business. This is comparable to other types of business that go bankrupt. However, because banks are heavily regulated by government entities, including the Federal Reserve System, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and Comptroller of the Currency, bank failure does not necessarily mean that the bank ceases to operated. In may cases, such a failure means the operation of the bank is take over by one of the government entities. The troubled bank might also be allowed or "encouraged" to merge with another, healthier bank.

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KEYNESIAN ECONOMICS: A school of thought developed by John Maynard Keynes built on the proposition that aggregate demand is the primary source of business cycle instability, especially recessions. The basic structure of Keynesian economics was initially presented in Keynes' book The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, published in 1936. For the next forty years, the Keynesian school dominated the economics discipline and reached a pinnacle as a guide for federal government policy in the 1960s. It fell out of favor in the 1970s and 1980s, as monetarism, neoclassical economics, supply-side economics, and rational expectations became more widely accepted, but it still has a strong following in the academic and policy-making arenas.

     See also | Keynesian theory | macroeconomics | Great Depression | aggregate demand | business cycle | recession | depression | classical economics | monetarism | cross elasticity of demand | supply-side economics | full employment | Keynesian cross | unemployment rate | gross domestic product | full employment | equilibrium | investment expenditures | consumption function | marginal propensity to consume | multiplier | fiscal policy | monetary policy | inflation | stagflation | aggregate supply | aggregate market |


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KEYNESIAN ECONOMICS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2020. [Accessed: February 24, 2020].


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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES DETERMINANTS

Ceteris paribus factors, other than aggregate income or production, that are held constant when the aggregate expenditures line is constructed and which cause the aggregate expenditures line to shift when they change. Some of the more important aggregate expenditures determinants are interest rates, expectations, fiscal policy, wealth, and exchange rates.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall hoping to buy either an extra large beach blanket or a large flower pot shaped like a Greek urn. Be on the lookout for small children selling products door-to-door.
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In 1914, Ford paid workers who were age 22 or older $5 per day -- double the average wage offered by other car factories.
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