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January 24, 2018 

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SEASONAL UNEMPLOYMENT: Unemployment is caused by relatively regular and predictable declines in particular industries or occupations over the course of a year, often corresponding with the seasons. Unlike cyclical unemployment, that could occur at any time, seasonal unemployment is an essential part of many jobs. For example, your regular, run-of-the-mill, department store Santa Clause can count on 11 months of unemployment each year. Seasonal unemployment is one of four unemployment sources. The other three are cyclical unemployment, frictional unemployment, and structural unemployment.

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KEYNESIAN ECONOMICS: A school of thought developed by John Maynard Keynes built on the proposition that aggregate demand is the primary source of business cycle instability, especially recessions. The basic structure of Keynesian economics was initially presented in Keynes' book The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, published in 1936. For the next forty years, the Keynesian school dominated the economics discipline and reached a pinnacle as a guide for federal government policy in the 1960s. It fell out of favor in the 1970s and 1980s, as monetarism, neoclassical economics, supply-side economics, and rational expectations became more widely accepted, but it still has a strong following in the academic and policy-making arenas.

     See also | Keynesian theory | macroeconomics | Great Depression | aggregate demand | business cycle | recession | depression | classical economics | monetarism | cross elasticity of demand | supply-side economics | full employment | Keynesian cross | unemployment rate | gross domestic product | full employment | equilibrium | investment expenditures | consumption function | marginal propensity to consume | multiplier | fiscal policy | monetary policy | inflation | stagflation | aggregate supply | aggregate market |


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INELASTIC

The general relation between two variables in which relatively large changes in one variable (A) cause relatively small changes in another variable (B). In other words, large changes in variable A cause relatively small changes in variable B or the percentage change in variable B is smaller than the percentage change in variable A. This characterization of elasticity is most important for the price elasticity of demand and the price elasticity of supply. Inelastic is one of two general elasticity relations between two variables. The other is elastic.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall hoping to buy either blue cotton balls or a genuine down-filled pillow. Be on the lookout for the last item on a shelf.
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Woodrow Wilson's portrait adorned the $100,000 bill that was removed from circulation in 1929. Woodrow Wilson was removed from circulation in 1924.
"Wherever you go, no matter what the weather, always bring your own sunshine."

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