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GOVERNMENT ENTERPRISES: Government owned and operated productive activities that operate much like private sector firms. They hire resources and purchase other inputs, then produce goods that are sold through markets. In some cases, government enterprises compete directly with private firms. One common example of a government enterprise is a city-operated electrical generation and distribution system. In some cities, this service is provided by private, for-profit, businesses and in other cities it is provided by government. Other examples of government enterprises include urban transportation systems, parks and recreational facilities, and communication systems.

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INVESTMENT EXPENDITURES: Expenditures by the business sector on final goods and services, in particular, capital goods like factories and equipment, undertaken in a given time period.

     See also | Keynesian economics | investment line | national income | marginal propensity to invest | aggregate expenditures | aggregate expenditures line | Keynesian cross | saving-investment model | induced investment | autonomous investment |


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INVESTMENT EXPENDITURES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: April 20, 2018].


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KEYNESIAN CROSS

A diagram illustrating the basic Keynesian theory of macroeconomics, with aggregate expenditures measured on the vertical axis and aggregate production measured on the horizontal axis, with the relation between aggregate expenditures and aggregate production represented by a positively-sloped aggregate expenditures line. The "cross" aspect of this diagram is the intersection between the aggregate expenditures line and a 45-degree line indicating every point of equality between aggregate expenditures and aggregate production. The "Keynesian" aspect of this diagram is derived from John Maynard Keynes, the developer and namesake of Keynesian economics.

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