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August 23, 2019 

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AGGLOMERATION ECONOMIES: A reduction in production cost the results when related firms locate near one another. Firms can be related as competitors in the same industry, by using the same inputs, or through providing output to the same demographic group. The fashion industry, for example, experiences agglomeration economies because they can share specialized inputs (photographers, models) that would be too expensive to employ full time. Retail stores have agglomeration economies when located in shopping malls because they have access to a large group of potential customers with lower advertising cost. Agglomeration economies is given as one of the primary reasons for the emergence of urban areas.

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RECESSION: The common term used for the contraction phase of the business cycle. A general period of declining economic activity. During a recession, real gross domestic product declines by 10 percent or so and the unemployment rate rises from it's full employment 5 percent level up to the 6 to 10 percent range. Inflation tends to be low or non-existent during a recession. Recession last anywhere from six to eighteen months, with one year being common.

     See also | business cycle | contraction | real gross domestic product | unemployment rate | inflation | full employment | expansion | peak | trough | recovery | depression | recessionary gap |


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RECESSION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: August 23, 2019].


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VOTING PARADOX

The possibility that the voting preferences of a group of individuals results in an inconsistent, or intransitive, ranking. While consistent, or transitive, ranking of preferences is expected for individuals, such might not occur for groups of voters. If a consumer prefers good A to good B and good B to good C, then it makes logical sense that the consumer also prefers good A to good C. The voting paradox arises because a group of individuals might prefer A to B and B to C, but then prefer C to A, an inconsistent and intransitive ranking of preferences. Other related voting problems identified by the study of public choice includes the median voter principle, logrolling, and voter apathy (due to rational ignorance and rational abstention).

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing about a thrift store hoping to buy either a genuine down-filled pillow or one of those "hang in there" kitty cat posters. Be on the lookout for small children selling products door-to-door.
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Lombard Street is London's equivalent of New York's Wall Street.
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