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April 5, 2020 

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AGGLOMERATION ECONOMIES: A reduction in production cost the results when related firms locate near one another. Firms can be related as competitors in the same industry, by using the same inputs, or through providing output to the same demographic group. The fashion industry, for example, experiences agglomeration economies because they can share specialized inputs (photographers, models) that would be too expensive to employ full time. Retail stores have agglomeration economies when located in shopping malls because they have access to a large group of potential customers with lower advertising cost. Agglomeration economies is given as one of the primary reasons for the emergence of urban areas.

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RECESSIONARY GAP: The difference between the equilibrium real production achieved in the short-run aggregate market and full-employment real production the occurs when short-run equilibrium real production is less than full-employment real production. A recessionary gap, also termed a contractionary gap, is associated with a business-cycle contraction. This is one of two alternative output gaps that can occur when short-run production differs from full employment. The other is an inflationary gap.

     See also | short-run aggregate market | short-run equilibrium | macroeconomics | full-employment real production | price level | recession | contraction | business cycle | unemployment | output gaps | inflationary gap |


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RECESSIONARY GAP, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2020. [Accessed: April 5, 2020].


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MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION, DEMAND

The demand curve for the output produced by a monopolistically competitive firm is relatively elastic. The firm can sell a wide range of output within a relatively narrow range of prices. As a price maker, the firm has some ability (not much, but some) to control price. The demand curve is negatively sloped, but relatively elastic, because each firm produces a slightly differentiated product, but faces competition from a large number of very, very close substitutes.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall trying to buy either a T-shirt commemorating last Friday (you know why) or a rotisserie oven that can also toast bread. Be on the lookout for door-to-door salesmen.
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The first U.S. fire insurance company was established by Benjamin Franklin in 1752 in Philadelphia.
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