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August 24, 2019 

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IMPLICIT OPPORTUNITY COST: An opportunity cost that does NOT involve a money payment or a market transaction. This should be contrasted with explicit cost that DOES involve a money payment or a market transaction. The common misconception among non-economists out there in the real world is that the term "cost" is synonymous with the term "payment," that is, all costs are explicit costs, to be a cost you have to give up some money. Well, I'm here to tell you that this isn't true. Cost is opportunity cost. It's the satisfaction NOT received from activities NOT pursued. It's the value of foregone production. And not all opportunity costs involve a money payment.

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AXES: Two number lines that are joined at a right angle such that they intersect at their zero points (called the origin). The vertical axis is by convention termed the Y-axes and the horizontal axis is termed the X-axis. These axes are used to locate or plot pairs of numbers in coordinate space, one value for the X-variable coordinate and a corresponding value for the Y-variable coordinate. More often than not, coordinate number pairs are used to plot relationships that can be connected by one or more lines. This line construction procedure is one of the more powerful tools used by economists. Economists typically analyze relationships between two variables, such as price and quantity demanded. By letting one axis measure price and the other measure quantity demanded, these axes form the framework, the guidelines if you will, for constructing a demand curve (the relationship between price and quantity demanded). Once we have an abstract relationship graphed out, then it can be used to perform all sorts of economic analysis.

     See also | origin | vertical axis | horizontal axis | curve | slope | quantity demanded | demand curve | economic analysis |


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AXES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2019. [Accessed: August 24, 2019].


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INTEREST RATES, AGGREGATE DEMAND DETERMINANT

One of several specific aggregate demand determinants assumed constant when the aggregate demand curve is constructed, and that shifts the aggregate demand curve when it changes. An increase in interest rates cause a decrease (leftward shift) of the aggregate curve. A decrease in interest rates an increase (rightward shift) of the aggregate curve. Other notable aggregate demand determinants include the federal deficit, inflationary expectations, and the money supply.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall wanting to buy either a coffee cup commemorating Thor Heyerdahl's Pacific crossing aboard the Kon-Tiki or a rechargeable battery for your cell phone. Be on the lookout for fairy dust that tastes like salt.
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