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July 20, 2018 

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LEVERAGED BUYOUT: A method of corporate takeover or merger popularized in the 1980s in which the controlling interest in a company's corporate stock was purchased using a substantial fraction of borrowed funds. These takeovers were, as the financial-types say, heavily leveraged. The person or company doing the "taking over" used very little of their own money and borrowed the rest, often by issuing extremely risky, but high interest, "junk" bonds. These bonds were high-risk, and thus paid a high interest rate, because little or nothing backed them up.

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CHANGE IN AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES: The movement along an aggregate demand curve caused by a change in the price level. This should be contrasted directly with a change in aggregate demand. You might also want to review the terms change in quantity demanded and change in demand, as well. A change in aggregate expenditures means that we have identified a NEW level of expenditures on the existing aggregate demand curve. In contrast, a change in aggregate demand means that we have changed, moved, or shifted, the entire aggregate demand curve, the whole range of price levels and aggregate expenditures has changed.

     See also | aggregate demand | aggregate demand curve | aggregate demand determinants | price level | real production | aggregate expenditures | change in aggregate demand | change in quantity demanded | change in demand | market demand |


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CHANGE IN AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: July 20, 2018].


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PRICE DISCRIMINATION

The act of selling the same good to different buyers for different prices that are not justified by different production costs. This is practiced by suppliers who have achieved some degree of market control, especially monopoly. Common examples of price discrimination are electricity rates, long-distance telephone charges, movie ticket prices, airplane ticket prices, and assorted child or senior citizen discounts. Price discrimination takes the form of one of three degrees: (1) first degree, in which each price is the maximum price that buyers are willing and able to pay, (2) second degree, in which price is based on the quantity sold, and (3) third degree, in which prices are based on an easily identifiable characteristic of the buyer.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing through a long list of dot com websites trying to buy either a 50-foot blue garden hose or a turbo-powered vacuum cleaner. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from long-lost relatives.
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The 22.6% decline in stock prices on October 19, 1987 was larger than the infamous 12.8% decline on October 29, 1929.
"There is no point at which you can say, Well, I'm successful now. I might as well take a nap."

-- Carrie Fisher, actress, writer

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