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October 19, 2018 

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POINT ELASTICITY: The relatively responsiveness of a change in one variable (call it B) to an infinitesimally small change in another variable (call it A). The notion of point elasticity typically comes into play when discussing the elasticity at a specific point on a curve.< P>Point elasticity can be calculated in a number of different ways. Sophisticated economists, using sophisticated mathematical techniques (better known as calculus) can calculate point elasticity by taking derivatives of equations. Derivatives is fancy calculus talk for infinitesimally small changes.

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DISEQUILIBRIUM, AGGREGATE MARKET: The state of the aggregate market in which real aggregate expenditures are NOT equal to real production, which result in imbalances that induce changes in the price level, aggregate expenditures, and/or real production. In other words, the opposing forces of aggregate demand (the buyers) and aggregate supply (the sellers) are out of balance. Either the four macroeconomic sector (households, business, government, and foreign) buyers are unable to purchase all of the real production that they seek at the existing price level or business-sector producers are unable to sell all of the real production that they have available at the existing price level.

     See also | aggregate market | equilibrium, aggregate market | disequilibrium | aggregate expenditures | price level | real production | aggregate demand | aggregate supply |


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DISEQUILIBRIUM, AGGREGATE MARKET, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: October 19, 2018].


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SEASONAL UNEMPLOYMENT

Unemployment attributable to relatively regular and predictable declines in particular industries or occupations over the course of a year, often corresponding with the climatic seasons. Unlike cyclical unemployment, which may or may not occur at any given time, seasonal unemployment is an essential part of many jobs. For example, a regular, run-of-the-mill, department store Santa Clause can count on 11 months of unemployment each year. Seasonal unemployment is one of four unemployment sources. The other three are cyclical unemployment, frictional unemployment, and structural unemployment.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time browsing through a long list of dot com websites looking to buy either a birthday greeting card for your aunt or a wall poster commemorating the moon landing. Be on the lookout for neighborhood pets, especially belligerent parrots.
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Okun's Law posits that the unemployment rate increases by 1% for every 2% gap between real GDP and full-employment real GDP.
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