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December 8, 2022 

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FINAL GOODS: Goods (or services) that are available for purchase by the ultimate or intended user with no plans for further physical transformation or as an input in the production of other goods that will be resold. Gross domestic product seeks to measure the market value of final goods. Final goods are purchased through product markets by the four basic macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) as consumption expenditures, investment expenditures, government purchases, and exports. Final goods, which are closely related to the term current production, should be contrasted with intermediate goods--goods (and services) that will be further processed before reaching their ultimate user.

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ELASTICITY ALTERNATIVES: Five categories of elasticity that form a continuum indicating the relatively responsiveness of a change in one variable (usually quantity demanded or quantity supplied) to a change in another variable (usually demand price or supply price). These five alternatives--perfectly elastic, relatively elastic, unit elastic, relatively inelastic, and perfectly inelastic--are most often are used to categorize the price elasticity of demand and the price elasticity of supply.

     See also | elasticity | elastic | inelastic | relatively inelastic | perfectly inelastic | relatively elastic | unit elastic | perfectly elastic | elasticity alternatives, demand | elasticity alternatives, supply | coefficient of elasticity | elasticity determinants |


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ELASTICITY ALTERNATIVES, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: December 8, 2022].


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KEYNESIAN ECONOMICS

A theory of macroeconomics developed by John Maynard Keynes based on the proposition that aggregate demand is the primary source of business-cycle instability and the most important cause of recessions. Keynesian economics points to discretionary government policies, especially fiscal policy, as the primary means of stabilizing business cycles and tends to be favored by those on the liberal end of the political spectrum. The basic principles of Keynesian economics were developed by Keynes in his book, The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, published in 1936. This work launched the modern study of macroeconomics and served as a guide for both macroeconomic theory and macroeconomic policies for four decades. Although it fell out of favor in the 1980s, Keynesian principles remain important to modern macroeconomic theories, especially aggregate market (AS-AD) analysis.

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The first paper currency used in North America was pasteboard playing cards "temporarily" authorized as money by the colonial governor of French Canada, awaiting "real money" from France.
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