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URBAN ECONOMICS: The economic study of cities and urban areas based on the consideration of space, transportation cost, and location in production and consumption decisions. Urban economics studies a wide variety of topics, how and why cities are formed, how land is used within cities, the location of one city relative to another, and the relative size of cities. A closely related area of study that focuses on economic activity in larger regions is termed regional economics.

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ELASTICITY: The relative response of one variable to changes in another variable. The phrase "relative response" is best interpreted as the percentage change. For example, the price elasticity of demand, one of the more important applications of this concept in economics, is the percentage change in quantity demanded measured against the percentage change in price. Other notable economic elasticities are the price elasticity of supply, income elasticity of demand, and cross elasticity of demand.

     See also | elastic | inelastic | relatively inelastic | perfectly inelastic | relatively elastic | unit elastic | perfectly elastic | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | income elasticity of demand | cross elasticity of demand | elastic demand | inelastic demand | inelastic supply | elastic supply | elasticity determinants | elasticity and demand slope | elasticity alternatives | coefficient of elasticity | midpoint formula | arc elasticity | point elasticity |


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ELASTICITY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: June 29, 2022].


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SHORTAGE

A condition in the market in which the quantity demanded is greater than the quantity supplied at the existing price. Because buyers are unable to buy as much of the good as they want, a shortage generally causes an increase in the market price, which then acts to restore equilibrium. A shortage, which also goes by the terms excess demand and sellers' market, is one of two basic states of disequilibrium for the market. The other is surplus.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time waiting for visits from door-to-door solicitors hoping to buy either a wall poster commemorating the 2000 Presidential election or a rechargeable flashlight. Be on the lookout for strangers with large satchels of used undergarments.
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