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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURE EQUATION: An equation indicating that aggregate expenditures (AE) are the sum of consumption expenditures (C), investment expenditures (I), government purchases (G), and net exports (X-M), stated as: AE = C + I + G + (X-M). This equation surfaces in the Keynesian economic income-expenditure model in the form of the aggregate expenditures line. However, it's also central throughout the study of macroeconomics, including aggregate demand and the measurement of gross domestic product.

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ELASTICITY: The relative response of one variable to changes in another variable. The phrase "relative response" is best interpreted as the percentage change. For example, the price elasticity of demand, one of the more important applications of this concept in economics, is the percentage change in quantity demanded measured against the percentage change in price. Other notable economic elasticities are the price elasticity of supply, income elasticity of demand, and cross elasticity of demand.

     See also | elastic | inelastic | relatively inelastic | perfectly inelastic | relatively elastic | unit elastic | perfectly elastic | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | income elasticity of demand | cross elasticity of demand | elastic demand | inelastic demand | inelastic supply | elastic supply | elasticity determinants | elasticity and demand slope | elasticity alternatives | coefficient of elasticity | midpoint formula | arc elasticity | point elasticity |


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DECREASING RETURNS TO SCALE

A given proportional change in all resources in the long run results in a proportional smaller change in production. Decreasing returns to scale exists if a firm increases ALL resources--labor, capital, and other inputs--by a given proportion (say 10 percent) and output increases by less than this proportion (that is, less than 10 percent). This is one of three returns to scale. The other two are increasing returns to scale and constant returns to scale.

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