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INCENTIVE: A cost or benefit that motivates a decision or action by consumers, businesses, or other participants in the economy. Some incentives are explicitly created by government policies to achieve a desired end or they can just be part of the wacky world we call economics. The most noted incentive in the study of economics is that provided by prices. When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the . When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the allocation. When prices are higher buyers have the "incentive" to buy less and sellers have the "incentive" to sell more. Price incentives play a fundamental role in the allocation system that society uses to answer the three questions of allocation.

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PRICE ELASTICITY OF SUPPLY: The relative response of a change in quantity supplied to a relative change in price. More specifically the price elasticity of supply can be defined as the percentage change in quantity supplied due to a percentage change in supply price. The price elasticity of supply should be contrasted with the price elasticity of demand.

     See also | elasticity | price elasticity of demand | price | supply curve | law of supply | quantity supplied | elasticity alternatives, supply |


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PRICE ELASTICITY OF SUPPLY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: June 20, 2018].


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LONG RUN, MACROECONOMICS

In terms of the macroeconomic analysis of the aggregate market, a period of time in which all prices, especially wages, are flexible, and are able to achieve equilibrium levels. This is one of two macroeconomic time designations; the other is the short run. Long-run wage and price flexibility means that ALL markets, including resource markets and most notably labor markets, are in equilibrium, with neither surpluses nor shortages. Wage and price flexibility and the resulting resource market equilibria are the reason for the vertical long-run aggregate supply curve.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time watching infomercials seeking to buy either a coffee cup commemorating Thor Heyerdahl's Pacific crossing aboard the Kon-Tiki or a rechargeable battery for your cell phone. Be on the lookout for empty parking spaces that appear to be near the entrance to a store.
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In 1914, Ford paid workers who were age 22 or older $5 per day -- double the average wage offered by other car factories.
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-- Benjamin Franklin, statesman, inventor

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