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March 5, 2024 

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RISK POOLING: Combining the uncertainty of individuals into a calculable risk for large groups. For example, you may or may not contract the flu this year. However, if you're thrown in with 99,999 other people, then health-care types who spend their lives measuring the odds of an illness, can predict that 1 percent of the group, or 1,000 people, will get the flu. The uncertainty is that they probably don't know which 1,000 people, they only know the number afflicted. This little bit of information is what makes risk pooling possible. If the cost is $50 per illness, then an insurance company can insure your 100,000-member group against flu if they collect $50,000 ($50 x 1,000 sick people), or 50 cents per person. By agreeing to pay the cost of each sick person in exchange for the 50 cent payments, the insurance company has effectively pooled the risk of the group.

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HEDONIC PRICE: The notion that the price of good is based on an assortment of characteristics that are both intrinsic to the good itself and external to the good. Hedonic pricing is commonly applied to the housing market in which the price of housing is based on the physical characteristics of the house (size, appearance, features) and the surrounding neighborhood (accessibility to schools and shopping, quality of other houses, availability of public services). Estimating hedonic prices makes it possible to identify the extent to which specific factors affect the price.

     See also | hedonic | price | hedonic pricing model | satisfaction | utility | wants and needs | second rule of subjectivity | consumption |


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HEDONIC PRICE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: March 5, 2024].


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MONEY CREATION

The process in which banks increase the amount of funds in checkable deposits (and thus the M1 money supply) by using reserves to make loans. Money creation is made possible through fractional-reserve banking. Because banks keep only a fraction of deposits as reserves, extra reserves can be used to back up and create additional checkable deposits (money) that did not previously exist. Government policy makers (the Federal Reserve System) rely on the money creation process when conducting monetary policy. Money creation by banks is a modern alternative to printing paper currency.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the downtown area looking to buy either any book written by Isaac Asimov or a how-to book on building remote controlled airplanes. Be on the lookout for celebrities who speak directly to you through your television.
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