March 21, 2018 

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AD CURVE: The aggregate demand curve, which is a graphical representation of the relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level, holding all ceteris paribus aggregate demand determinants constant. The aggregate demand, or AD, curve is one side of the graphical presentation of the aggregate market. The other side is occupied by the aggregate supply curve (which is actually two curves, the long-run aggregate supply curve and the short-run aggregate supply curve). The negative slope of the aggregate demand curve captures the inverse relation between aggregate expenditures on real production and the price level. This negative slope is attributable to the interest-rate effect, real-balance effect, and net-export effect.

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HOMOGENEOUS OF DEGREE ONE: A property of an equation the exists if independent variables are increased by a constant value, then the dependent variable is increased by the same value. In other words, if the independent variables are doubled, then the dependent variable is also doubled. This property often surfaces in the analysis of production functions. A production function homogeneous of degree one is said to have constant returns to scale.

     See also | homogeneous | production function | independent variable | dependent variable | constant returns to scale | homogeneous of degree n | homogeneous of degree zero | economies of scale |

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A resource with an available quantity less than its desired use. Scarce, or economic, resources are also called factors of production and are generally classified as either labor, capital, land, or entrepreneurship. Scarce resources are the workers, equipment, raw materials, and organizers used to produce scarce goods. Like the more general society-wide condition of scarcity, a given resource falls into the scarce category because it has a limited availability in combination with greater (potentially unlimited) productive uses.

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