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April 23, 2018 

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BANK RESERVES: The "money" that banks use to conduct day-to-day business, including cashing checks, satisfying customers's withdrawals, and clearing checks between accounts at different banks. The "money" in question includes vault cash and Federal Reserve deposits. Specifically, vault cash is the paper money and coins that a bank keeps on the bank premises (both in the vault and in teller drawers), which is used to "cash" checks and otherwise provide the funds that customers withdraw. Federal Reserve deposits are accounts that banks keep with the Federal Reserve System, which are used to process, in a systematic, centralized fashion, the millions of checks written each day by customers of one bank that are deposited by customers of another bank. Using these deposits, the Fed acts as a central clearing house for checks, being able to simultaneously debit the account of one bank and credit the account of another. More on the importance of bank reserves can be found under fractional-reserve banking.

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HOMOGENEOUS OF DEGREE N: A property of an equation the exists if independent variables are increased by a constant value, then the dependent variable is increased by the value raised to the power of n. The value of n can be greater than, less than, or equal to one. This property often surfaces in the analysis of production functions. If n = 1, then a doubling independent variables results in a doubling of the dependent variable and the production function has constant returns to scale. If n > 1, then a doubling independent variables results in more than a doubling of the dependent variable and the production function has increasing returns to scale. If n < 1, then a doubling independent variables results in less than a doubling of the dependent variable and the production function has decreasing returns to scale.

     See also | homogeneous | production function | independent variable | dependent variable | constant returns to scale | increasing returns to scale | decreasing returns to scale | homogeneous of degree one | homogeneous of degree zero | economies of scale |


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SHORT RUN, MACROECONOMICS

In terms of macroeconomic analysis, especially the aggregate market (AS-AD) analysis, a period of time in which some prices, notably wages, are rigid, inflexible, or otherwise in the process of adjusting. This is one of two macroeconomic time designations; the other is the long run. Short-run wage and price rigidity prevents some markets, especially resource markets and most notably labor markets, from achieving equilibrium. Wage and price rigidity and the resulting resource market imbalances are the source of the positively-sloped short-run aggregate supply curve.

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During the American Revolution, the price of corn rose 10,000 percent, the price of wheat 14,000 percent, the price of flour 15,000 percent, and the price of beef 33,000 percent.
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-- Hugh White, U.S. Senator

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