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April 17, 2024 

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YIELD: The rate of return on a financial asset. In some simple cases, the yield on a financial asset, like commercial paper, corporate bond, or government security, is the asset's interest rate. However, as a more general rule, the yield includes both the interest earned from an asset plus any changes in the asset's price. Suppose, for example, that a $100,000 bond has a 10 percent interest rate, such that the holder receives $10,000 interest per year. If the price of the bond increases over the course of the year from $100,000 to $105,000, then the bond's yield is greater than 10 percent. It includes the $10,000 interest plus the $5,000 bump in the price, giving a yield of 15 percent. Because bonds and similar financial assets often have fixed interest payments, their prices and subsequently yields move up and down as economic conditions change.

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NEAR-PUBLIC GOOD: A good that's easy to keep nonpayers from consuming, but use of the good by one person doesn't prevent use by others. The trick with a near-public good is that it's easy to keep people away, and thus you can charge them a price for consuming, but there's no real good reason to do so. From an efficiency view, the more people who consume a near-public good, the better off society. This mixture of nearly unlimited benefits and the ability to charge a price means that some near-public goods are sold through markets and others are provided by government. For efficiency's sake, none should be sold through markets.

     See also | excludability | rival consumption | good types | common-property good | public good | private good | efficiency | user charge |


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INDETERMINANT

The directional change in a variable, resulting from the disruption of an equilibrium that is identified using comparative statics, is not known. This term is commonly used to indicate that the change in either price or quantity is unknown when the market experiences simultaneous shifts in both the demand and supply curves. For example, an increase in both demand and supply definitely cause an increase in the quantity exchanged. But whether the market price increases or decreases is indeterminant.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time strolling around a discount warehouse buying club wanting to buy either super soft, super cuddly, stuffed animals or a large stuffed brown and white teddy bear. Be on the lookout for pencil sharpeners with an attitude.
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One of the largest markets for gold in the United States is the manufacturing of class rings.
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