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September 18, 2018 

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NO-RESERVE BANKING: A (hypothetical) method of banking in which banks keep 0 percent of their deposits in the form of bank reserves, meaning that ALL deposits are used for interest-paying loans. No-reserve banking is one of two theoretical alternatives designed to help illustrate a contrast to the fractional-reserve banking actually practiced by modern banks. The other alternative is full-reserve banking. With the no-reserve approach a bank operates as financial intermediary or broker, matching up borrowers and lenders.

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NOT IN THE LABOR FORCE: Anyone who is not classified by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) as either employed persons or unemployed persons. The combination of employed persons and unemployed persons is the official specification of the civilian labor force, meaning anyone who does not qualify for the civilian labor force is classified as "not in the labor force." This catch-all category is largely comprised of several notable segments of the population, such as young, elderly, homemakers, and military. However, it includes others who are either unwilling or unable to engage in productive activities for assorted reasons.

     See also | employment | unemployment | employed persons | unemployed persons | civilian labor force | Bureau of Labor Statistics | Current Population Survey |


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NOT IN THE LABOR FORCE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: September 18, 2018].


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PERFECT COMPETITION

An ideal market structure characterized by a large number of small firms, identical products sold by all firms, freedom of entry into and exit out of the industry, and perfect knowledge of prices and technology. This is one of four basic market structures. The other three are monopoly, oligopoly, and monopolistic competition. Perfect competition is an idealized market structure that is not observed in the real world. While unrealistic, it does provide an excellent benchmark that can be used to analyze real world market structures. In particular, perfect competition efficiently allocates resources.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the downtown area looking to buy either a how-to book on home remodeling or a tall storage cabinet with five shelves and a secure lock. Be on the lookout for florescent light bulbs that hum folk songs from the sixties.
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The wealthy industrialist, Andrew Carnegie, was once removed from a London tram because he lacked the money needed for the fare.
"As the births of living creatures at first are ill-shapen, so are all innovations, which are the births of time. "

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