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January 20, 2022 

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MARKET POWER: The ability of buyers or sellers to exert influence over the price or quantity of a good, service, or commodity exchanged in a market. Market power largely depends on the number of competitors on each side of the market. If a market has relatively few buyers, but many sellers, then limited competition on the demand-side of the market means buyers tend to have relatively more market power than sellers. The converse occurs if there are many buyers, but relatively few sellers. This is also termed market control.

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PRICE LEADERSHIP: A method used by a group of firms in the same market (typically oligopoly firms) in which one firm takes the lead in setting or changing prices, with other firms then following behind. The lead firm is often the largest firm in the industry, but it could be a smaller firm that has just historically assumed the role of price leader perhaps because it is more aware of changing market conditions. While price leadership is totally legal, it could be a sign of collusion, particular implicit collusion, in which the firms have effectively monopolized the market.

     See also | oligopoly | collusion | price rigidity | kinked-demand curve | nonprice competition | government intervention | antitrust laws |


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PRICE LEADERSHIP, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: January 20, 2022].


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MARGINAL UTILITY OF INCOME

The change in utility resulting from a given change in income. This is a specialized case of the general notion of marginal utility, which is simply the change in utility resulting from a given change in the consumption of a good. Marginal utility of income is key to identifying alternative risk preferences, including risk aversion, risk neutrality, and risk loving. These three risk preferences are indicated by three marginal utility of income possibilities, decreasing (risk aversion), increasing (risk loving), and constant (risk neutrality).

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time surfing the Internet looking to buy either a green and yellow striped sweater vest or a Boston Red Sox baseball cap. Be on the lookout for strangers with large satchels of used undergarments.
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