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JOINT DEMAND: Demand for two or more commodities that are either complements-in-consumption or complements-in-production. Joint demand results because two or more commodities are used together either to satisfy wants and needs or to produce goods and services. Because the commodities are used jointly, the demand for one good is necessarily based on the use and availability of another good. If, for example, you enjoy milk and brownies as complements-in-consumption, but the bakery is out of brownies, then your demand for milk is also likely to decline.

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PRIVATE SECTOR: A short-cut term that combines the households and businesses in the economy into a single group. This term should be contrasted directly with public sector, which is a comparable short-cut term for government. The distinction between private sector and public sector reflects the two basic methods of answering the three questions of allocation--markets and government. Markets make use of private ownership and control of resources (hence the term "private" sector) for voluntary allocation decisions.

     See also | household sector | business sector | public sector | government sector | three questions of allocation | ownership and control | liberal | conservative | government functions | market failure | fifth rule of imperfection | public choice | normative economics |


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M3

The wide-range monetary aggregate for the U.S. economy containing the combination of M2 (currency, checkable deposits, and assorted savings deposits) and large-denomination, institutional near monies. M3 contains financial assets that are relatively liquid, but not quite as liquid as those found in M1 or M2. The near monies added to M2 to derive M3 include large denomination certificates of deposit, institutional money market mutual funds, repurchase agreements, and Eurodollars. M3 is one of three monetary aggregates tracked and reported by the Federal Reserve System. The other two are designated M1 and M2.

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