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March 26, 2017 

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NORMATIVE ECONOMICS: The branch of economics that states the way the economy should operate. A normative statement is based on values and can be proved neither right or wrong. While positive economics seeks to explain the way it is, normative economics, the policy side of economics, seeks to prescribe the way it should be. Normative economics is used to recommend ways to change the world, to improve it, and to make it a better place for both man and beast.

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CONSERVATIVE: A political view that favors -- (1) limited government, (2) extensive reliance on markets, (3) strong national defense, (4) protection and promotion of existing cultural ideals and beliefs, and (5) economic rewards predominately based on productive efforts. Conservatives tend to come from the ranks of the second estate (or second-estate wannabes), with extensive ownership of and control over resources. As such, they support policies and first estate leaders that protect their interests. Conservatives tend to be strong advocates of free enterprise and find philosophical agreement with neoclassical economics, new classical economics, rational expectations, and monetarism theories that call for limited government intervention in the economy.

     See also | liberal | government | market | second estate | free enterprise | capitalism | cross elasticity of demand | new classical economics | monetarism | incentive | laissez faire | regulation | deregulation |


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CONSERVATIVE, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2017. [Accessed: March 26, 2017].


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AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES LINE

A graphical depiction of the relation between aggregate expenditures by the four macroeconomic sectors (household, business, government, and foreign) and the level of aggregate income or production. In Keynesian economics, the aggregate expenditures line is the essential component of the Keynesian cross analysis used to identify equilibrium income and production. Like any straight line, the aggregate expenditures line is characterized by vertical intercept, which indicates autonomous expenditures, and slope, which indicates induced expenditures. The aggregate expenditures line used in Keynesian economics is derived by adding or stacking investment, government purchases, and net exports to the consumption line.

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