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KEYNESIAN: Relating to the macroeconomic theory developed by John Maynard Keynes to address the problem of the persistently high unemployment occurring during the Great Depression. This word is commonly used as a modifier for other terms, such as Keynesian economics, Keynesian policy, or Keynesian equilibrium. Beyond the theory itself, the term Keynesian has come to reflect a particular philosophy toward government and the economy that a market-based economy is unlikely to achieve the macroeconomic goals of full employment, growth, and stability without the active use of government policies.

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PRODUCTION POSSIBILITIES CURVE: A curve that illustrates the production possibilities for the economy. A production possibilities curve (or PPC), like the one presented here, represents the boundary or frontier of the economy's production capabilities. That's why it's also frequently termed a production possibilities frontier (or PPF). As a frontier, it is the maximum production possible given existing (fixed) resources and technology. Producing on the curve means resources are fully employed, while producing inside the curve means resources are unemployed. The law of increasing opportunity cost is what gives the curve its distinctive convex shape.

     See also | production possibilities | production possibilities schedule | resources | technology | full employment | unemployment | opportunity cost | economic growth | law of increasing opportunity cost | scarcity | convex |


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ARC ELASTICITY

The average elasticity for discrete changes in two variables. The distinguishing characteristic of arc elasticity is that percentage changes are calculated based on the average of initial and ending values of each variable, rather than initial values. Arc elasticity is generally calculated using the midpoint elasticity formula. The contrast to arc elasticity is point elasticity. For infinitesimally small changes in two variables, arc elasticity is the same as point elasticity.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through the yellow pages seeking to buy either a coffee cup commemorating next Thursday or a replacement remote control for your stereo system. Be on the lookout for strangers with large satchels of used undergarments.
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The first "Black Friday" on record, a friday marked by a major financial catastrophe, occurred on September 24, 1869 -- A FRIDAY -- when an attempted cornering of the gold market induced a financial crises and economy-wide depression.
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