March 19, 2018 

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THREE-SECTOR AGGREGATE EXPENDITURES LINE: A graphical depiction of the relation between aggregate expenditures by the three domestic macroeconomic sectors (household, business, and government) and the level of aggregate income or production. The three-sector aggregate expenditures line combines consumption expenditures, investment expenditures, and government purchases. The slope of this aggregate expenditures line is based on the marginal propensity to consume, adjusted for marginal propensities of the other expenditures that are assumed to be induced when constructing the line. This is one of three aggregate expenditures lines based on the number of sectors included. The others are the two-sector aggregate expenditures line and the four-sector aggregate expenditures line.

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SCARCITY: A pervasive condition of human existence that exists because society has unlimited wants and needs, but limited resources used for their satisfaction. In other words, while we all want a bunch of stuff, we can't have everything that we want. In slightly different words, this scarcity problem means: (1) that there's never enough resources to produce everything that everyone would like produced; (2) that some people will have to do without some of the stuff that they want or need; (3) that doing one thing, producing one good, performing one activity, forces society to give up something else; and (4) that the same resources can not be used to produce two different goods at the same time. We live in a big, bad world of scarcity. This big, bad world of scarcity is what the study of economics is all about. That's why we usually subtitle scarcity: THE ECONOMIC PROBLEM.

     See also | first rule of scarcity | unlimited wants and needs | limited resources | satisfaction | resources | wants | needs | production | consumption | economics | opportunity cost | scarce resource |

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SCARCITY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama,, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: March 19, 2018].

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The total income that can be used by the household sector for either consumption expenditures or saving during a given period of time, usually one year. Disposable income (DI) is one of three measures of income reported in the National Income and Product Accounts maintained by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. The other two are national income (NI) and personal income (PI). Two related measures of production are gross domestic product (GDP) and net domestic product (NDP).

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a crowded estate auction wanting to buy either pink cotton balls or a genuine down-filled comforter. Be on the lookout for broken fingernail clippers.
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Lewis Carroll, the author of Alice in Wonderland, was the pseudonym of Charles Dodgson, an accomplished mathematician and economist.
"Whatever course you decide upon, there is always someone to tell you that you are wrong. There are always difficulties arising which tempt you to believe that your critics are right. To map out a course of action and follow it to an end requires...courage."

-- Ralph Waldo Emerson

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