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YIELD: The rate of return on a financial asset. In some simple cases, the yield on a financial asset, like commercial paper, corporate bond, or government security, is the asset's interest rate. However, as a more general rule, the yield includes both the interest earned from an asset plus any changes in the asset's price. Suppose, for example, that a $100,000 bond has a 10 percent interest rate, such that the holder receives $10,000 interest per year. If the price of the bond increases over the course of the year from $100,000 to $105,000, then the bond's yield is greater than 10 percent. It includes the $10,000 interest plus the $5,000 bump in the price, giving a yield of 15 percent. Because bonds and similar financial assets often have fixed interest payments, their prices and subsequently yields move up and down as economic conditions change.

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STATISTICAL DISCREPANCY: The official adjustment factor in the National Income and Product Accounts that ensures equality between the income and expenditures approaches to measuring gross domestic product. This is one of several differences between national income (the resource cost of production) and gross/net domestic product (the market value of production). For further discussion of this point, see gross domestic product and national income or net domestic product and national income. This statistical discrepancy tends to be relatively small, usually less than 1% of gross domestic product.

     See also | National Income and Product Accounts | Bureau of Economic Analysis | gross domestic product, expenditures | gross domestic product, income | national income | gross domestic product | net domestic product |


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INDUCED NET EXPORTS

Net exports by the foreign sector that depend on income or production (especially national income and gross domestic product). That is, changes in income induce changes in net exports. Induced net exports reflect the induced relation between imports and income, which means net exports decline as income increases. They are measured by the negative of the marginal propensity to import (MPM) and are reflected by the negative slope of net exports line. The alternative to induced net exports is autonomous net exports, which do not depend on income.

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