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September 25, 2022 

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PAR VALUE: The stated, or face, value of a legal claim or financial asset. For debt securities, such as corporate bonds or U. S. Treasury securities, this is amount to be repaid at the time of maturity. For equity securities, that is, corporate stocks, this is the initial value set up at the time it is issued. Par value, also called face value, is not necessarily, and often is not, equal to the current market price of the asset. A $10,000 U.S. Treasury note, for example, has a par value of $10,000, but might have a current market price of $9,950. The difference between par value and current price contributes to the yield or return on such assets. An asset is selling at a discount if the current price is less than the par value and is selling at a premium if the current price is more than the par value.

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PURE MARKET ECONOMY:

An economy, or economic system, that relies exclusively on markets to allocate resources and to answer all three questions of allocation. This theoretical ideal has no governments, markets are used to make all allocation decisions. Then contrasting theoretical ideal is a pure command economy in which governments make all allocation decisions.
Economic Systems
Economic Systems
A pure market economy is a theoretical extreme on the spectrum of economic systems that does not actually exist in the real world. It does, however, provide a benchmark that can be used for comparison with real world economic systems.

In pure market economies, markets are used by buyers and sellers to voluntarily exchange goods, services, and resources. Buyers seek to pay the lowest prices. Sellers seek to receive the highest prices. Resources are allocated to the production of the goods with the highest prices and greatest satisfaction of wants and needs.

The real world embodiment of a pure market economy is termed a market-oriented economy or capitalism. The market-oriented economy of the United States is the primary example.

While, in theory, resource allocation could be undertaken exclusively through markets or governments, in the real world, all economies rely on a mix of both markets and governments for allocation decisions, what is termed a mixed economy.

<= PURE COMMAND ECONOMY


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PURE MARKET ECONOMY, AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: September 25, 2022].


Check Out These Related Terms...

     | pure command economy | command economy | capitalism | socialism | communism | market socialism | market-oriented economy |


Or For A Little Background...

     | mixed economy | economic system | private sector | free enterprise | laissez faire | invisible hand |


And For Further Study...

     | three questions of allocation | distribution standards | government functions | property rights | political views | production possibilities |


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