March 21, 2018 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

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ASSUMPTIONS, CLASSICAL ECONOMICS: Classical economics, especially as directed toward macroeconomics, relies on three key assumptions--flexible prices, Say's law, and saving-investment equality. Flexible prices ensure that markets adjust to equilibrium and eliminate shortages and surpluses. Say's law states that supply creates its own demand and means that enough income is generated by production to purchase the resulting production. The saving-investment equality ensures that any income leaked from consumption into saving is replaced by an equal amount of investment. Although of questionable realism, these three assumptions imply that the economy would operate at full employment.

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Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Money Basics
  • What It Is
  • THE Medium
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: More About Money
  • Functions
  • Medium of Exchange
  • Measure of Value
  • Store of Value
  • Standard of Deferred Payment
  • Characteristics
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Monetary Aggregates
  • M1
  • M2
  • Near Monies
  • M3
  • L
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Money's History
  • Barter
  • Commodity Money
  • Metal Commodity Money
  • Fiat Money
  • Money
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Scarcity
  • Efficiency
  • Monetary Policy
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Course Home

    In this lesson, we examine my favorite economic topic -- money. In addition to being the root of all evil, money is a critical component of the macroeconomy. The basic rule is that too much money causes inflation and too little money causes unemployment. To lay the foundation for further study of money and the macroeconomy, this lesson presents the money basics, including what money is, what money does, how money is measured, and how money evolved to it's current format.

    • The first unit begins this lesson with a look at what money is (hint: anything that people use for exchanges), and money's role as a medium of exchange.
    • The main topics of the second unit are the four functions of money and the four characteristics of money.
    • The third unit then examines and compares the monetary aggregates, the official measures of money tracked by the U.S. government.
    • The history of money is the prime topic of the fourth unit, with a look at how modern fiat money evolved from self sufficiency, barter, and commodity money.
    • The fifth unit then ponders the connection between money, efficiency, and the scarcity problem, with an eye toward the use of monetary policies.

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    A change in the allocation of resources caused by placing taxes on economic activity. By creating disincentives to produce, consume, or exchange, taxes generally alter resource allocations. The allocation effect is typically used when governments seek to discourage the production, consumption, or exchange of particular goods or activities that are deemed undesirable (such as tobacco use or pollution). This is one of two effects of taxation. The other (primary) is the revenue effect, which is the generation of revenue used to finance government operations.

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