Google
Tuesday 
January 16, 2018 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
EIGHT-FIRM CONCENTRATION RATIO: The proportion of total output in an industry that's produced by the eight largest firms in the industry. This is one of two common concentration ratios. The other is the four-firm concentration ratio. The eight-firm concentration ratio is commonly used to indicate the degree to which an industry is oligopolistic and how market control is held by the eight largest firms in the industry.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

Lesson Contents
Unit 1: Buying Basics
  • The Concept
  • Demand Price
  • Quantity Demanded
  • Unit 1 Summary
  • Unit 2: Law of Demand
  • Definition
  • Income Effect
  • Substitution Effect
  • Unit 2 Summary
  • Unit 3: Demand Curve
  • Schedule
  • Curve
  • Space
  • Unit 3 Summary
  • Unit 4: Determinants
  • Ceteris Paribus Factors
  • Shifters: Increase
  • Shifters: Decrease
  • Types
  • Ch...Ch...Changes
  • Unit 4 Summary
  • Unit 5: Scarcity
  • Unlimited Wants
  • Unit 5 Summary
  • Unit 6:
  • Unit 6 Summary
  • Course Home
    Demand

    This lesson on demand offers a little insight into the purchases of a wide range of goods. In fact, this demand topic is does more than offer insight into buying behavior. It's also one half of the market analysis -- the other half being supply. And market analysis is one of the most widely used tools in the study of economics. Economists explain a lot of economic phenomenon using markets. But to use markets, we need demand. And that brings us back to this lesson.

    • In the first unit of this lesson we examine the basic concept of demand. While you've likely come across the term demand before, we'll see the specific way the term is used in economics.
    • The second unit then takes a look at the law of demand, which is one of the most important and most fundamental economic principles that we'll encounter.
    • As we more on to the third unit, our attention turns to the demand curve, which is the graphical embodiment of the demand concept.
    • In the fourth unit, we examine how the five basic demand determinants cause the demand curve to shift from one location to another.
    • And finally in the fifth unit, we make a connection between demand and the fundamental problem of scarcity.

    BEGIN Lesson =>


    <=PREVIOUS Lesson | NEXT Lesson =>

    AGGREGATE MARKET

    An economic model relating the price level and real production that is used to analyze business cycles, gross production, unemployment, inflation, stabilization policies, and related macroeconomic phenomena. The aggregate market, inspired by the standard market model, but adapted to the macroeconomy, captures the interaction between aggregate demand (the buyers) and short-run and long-run aggregate supply (the sellers). Also known by the names AS-AD model or income-price model, the aggregate market is THE cornerstone model of macroeconomic analysis.

    Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


    APLS

    BROWN PRAGMATOX
    [What's This?]

    Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time calling an endless list of 800 numbers hoping to buy either several orange mixing bowls or clothing for your pet dog. Be on the lookout for celebrities who speak directly to you through your television.
    Your Complete Scope

    This isn't me! What am I?

    Mark Twain said "I wonder how much it would take to buy soap buble if there was only one in the world."
    "Good humor is a tonic for mind and body. It is the best antidote for anxiety and depression. It is a business asset. It attracts and keeps friends. It lightens human burdens. It is the direct route to serenity and contentment."

    -- Grenville Kleiser, Author

    BIF
    Bank Insurance Fund
    A PEDestrian's Guide
    Xtra Credit
    Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

    User Feedback



    | AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
    | About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

    Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
    Copyright ©2000-2018 AmosWEB*LLC
    Send comments or questions to: WebMaster