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December 15, 2019 

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INDEX: A measure of the relative average of a group of items compared to a given base value. Index measures are commonly used in economics to combine and compare diverse measures. One common type of index measure is for prices, such as the Consumer Price Index and the Dow Jones Industrial Average of corporate stock prices. Another noted type of index measure is to track macroeconomic activity, especially the index leading economic indicators. Indexes are usually weighted averages rather than simple arithmetic means that are measured relative to a base value or period. The Consumer Price Index, for example, measures the prices of consumer good, weighted by the quantities purchased. The value of a given period is then stated relative to a base year value, which generates a pure, "unitless" number in the range of 100 (give or take).

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KEYNESIAN AGGREGATE SUPPLY CURVE: A modification of the standard aggregate supply curve used in the aggregate market (or AD-AD) analysis to reflect the basic assumptions of Keynesian economics. The Keynesian aggregate supply curve contains either two or three segments. The strict Keynesian aggregate supply curve contains two segments, a vertical classical range and a horizontal Keynesian range, meeting a right angle and forming a reverse L-shape. An alternative version replaces the right angle intersection with a gradual transition between the two segments that is positively sloped and termed the intermediate range. The modern aggregate supply curve is largely based on this intermediate range.

     See also | Keynesian economics | aggregate market | aggregate supply curve | classical range | Keynesian range | intermediate range |


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ALLOCATION EFFECT

A change in the allocation of resources caused by placing taxes on economic activity. By creating disincentives to produce, consume, or exchange, taxes generally alter resource allocations. The allocation effect is typically used when governments seek to discourage the production, consumption, or exchange of particular goods or activities that are deemed undesirable (such as tobacco use or pollution). This is one of two effects of taxation. The other (primary) is the revenue effect, which is the generation of revenue used to finance government operations.

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The 22.6% decline in stock prices on October 19, 1987 was larger than the infamous 12.8% decline on October 29, 1929.
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