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LONG-RUN MARGINAL COST: The change in the long-run total cost of producing a good or service resulting from a change in the quantity of output produced. Like all marginals, long-run marginal cost is the increment in the corresponding total. What's most notable about long-run marginal cost, however, is that we are operating in the long run. Unlike the short run, in which at least one input is fixed, there are no fixed inputs in the long run. As such, there is only variable cost. This means that long-run marginal cost is the result of changes in the cost of all inputs.

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KEYNESIAN AGGREGATE SUPPLY CURVE: A modification of the standard aggregate supply curve used in the aggregate market (or AD-AD) analysis to reflect the basic assumptions of Keynesian economics. The Keynesian aggregate supply curve contains either two or three segments. The strict Keynesian aggregate supply curve contains two segments, a vertical classical range and a horizontal Keynesian range, meeting a right angle and forming a reverse L-shape. An alternative version replaces the right angle intersection with a gradual transition between the two segments that is positively sloped and termed the intermediate range. The modern aggregate supply curve is largely based on this intermediate range.

     See also | Keynesian economics | aggregate market | aggregate supply curve | classical range | Keynesian range | intermediate range |


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UTILITY MAXIMIZATION

The process or goal of obtaining the highest level of utility from the consumption of goods or services. The goal of maximizing utility is a key assumption underlying consumer behavior studied in consumer demand theory. Consumers are assumed to make choices, especially concerning the purchase of goods, such that they obtain the highest possible level of satisfaction. Utility maximization can be achieved at the peak of the total utility curve.

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The earliest known use of paper currency was about 1270 in China during the rule of Kubla Khan.
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