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January 19, 2018 

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SLOPE, AGGREGATE DEMAND CURVE: The aggregate demand curve has a negative slope, reflecting the inverse relation between the price level and aggregate expenditures on real production. A higher price level is related to fewer aggregate expenditures and a lower price level is related to greater aggregate expenditures. The three reasons underlying the negative slope of the AD curve and the inverse relation between the price level and aggregate expenditures on real production are: real-balance effect; interest-rate effect; and net-export effect.

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KEYNESIAN RANGE: The horizontal segment of the Keynesian aggregate supply curve that reflects rigid prices and wages. Shifts of the aggregate demand curve in this range lead to changes in the aggregate output, but not changes in price level. Such results are consistent with Keynesian economics, which is why this is termed the "classical" range. The other ranges of the Keynesian aggregate supply curve are the classical range and the intermediate range.

     See also | Keynesian aggregate supply curve | Keynesian economics | rigid prices | price level | classical economics | classical range | intermediate range | gross domestic product |


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KEYNESIAN CROSS

A diagram illustrating the basic Keynesian theory of macroeconomics, with aggregate expenditures measured on the vertical axis and aggregate production measured on the horizontal axis, with the relation between aggregate expenditures and aggregate production represented by a positively-sloped aggregate expenditures line. The "cross" aspect of this diagram is the intersection between the aggregate expenditures line and a 45-degree line indicating every point of equality between aggregate expenditures and aggregate production. The "Keynesian" aspect of this diagram is derived from John Maynard Keynes, the developer and namesake of Keynesian economics.

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