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January 16, 2018 

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WELFARE: An assortment of programs that provide assistance to the poor. The cornerstone of our welfare system is Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), which was created by the Social Security Act (1935). It provides cash benefits to assist needy families with children under the age of 18. Funding comes partly from the federal government and partly from states. Because states also administer their own programs, benefits and qualification criteria differ from state to state. A second part of the welfare system, one that's run entirely by the federal government, is Supplemental Security Income (SSI). This program provides cash benefits to elderly, blind, and disabled in addition to any benefits received through the Social Security system. Our welfare system includes a whole bunch of additional benefits, including Medicaid, food stamps, low-cost housing, school lunches, job training, day care, and earned-income tax credits.

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INTERMEDIATE RANGE: The positively-sloped segment of the Keynesian aggregate supply curve that reflects the trade-off between aggregate output and the price level. Shifts of the aggregate demand curve in this range lead to changes in both aggregate output and the in price level. The intermediate range is consistent with the modern view of a positively sloped short-run aggregate supply curve. The other ranges of the Keynesian aggregate supply curve are the Keynesian range and the classical range.

     See also | Keynesian aggregate supply curve | Keynesian economics | aggregate output | price level | short-run aggregate supply curve | Keynesian range | classical range | gross domestic product |


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ARC ELASTICITY

The average elasticity for discrete changes in two variables. The distinguishing characteristic of arc elasticity is that percentage changes are calculated based on the average of initial and ending values of each variable, rather than initial values. Arc elasticity is generally calculated using the midpoint elasticity formula. The contrast to arc elasticity is point elasticity. For infinitesimally small changes in two variables, arc elasticity is the same as point elasticity.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time calling an endless list of 800 numbers hoping to buy either several orange mixing bowls or clothing for your pet dog. Be on the lookout for celebrities who speak directly to you through your television.
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In 1914, Ford paid workers who were age 22 or older $5 per day -- double the average wage offered by other car factories.
"Good humor is a tonic for mind and body. It is the best antidote for anxiety and depression. It is a business asset. It attracts and keeps friends. It lightens human burdens. It is the direct route to serenity and contentment."

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