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January 18, 2019 

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FACE VALUE: The stated, or face, value of a legal claim or financial asset. For debt securities, such as corporate bonds or U. S. Treasury securities, this is amount to be repaid at the time of maturity. For equity securities, that is, corporate stocks, this is the initial value set up at the time it is issued. Face value, also called par value, is not necessarily, and often is not, equal to the current market price of the asset. A $10,000 U.S. Treasury note, for example, has a face value of $10,000, but might have a current market price of $9,950. The difference between face value and current price contributes to the yield or return on such assets. An asset is selling at a discount if the current price is less than the face value and is selling at a premium if the current price is more than the par value.

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AVERAGE FACTOR COST: Total factor cost per unit of factor input, found by dividing total factor cost by the quantity of factor input. Average factor cost, abbreviated AFC, is essentially the factor price. However, using the longer term average factor cost let's us see the connection with other terms, like total factor cost and marginal factor cost.

     See also | total factor cost | factor price | marginal factor cost | factor markets | perfect competition | monopsony | market control | average cost | law of diminishing marginal returns |


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ECONOMICS

A social science that studies the allocation of limited resources used to produce the goods and services that satisfy unlimited consumer wants and needs. Economics is one of several social sciences (others are sociology, political science, and anthropology) which applies the scientific method to human behavior. The distinguishing feature of economics is a concern with the fundamental problem of scarcity--unlimited wants and needs and limited resources. Economics is commonly divided into two branches--macroeconomics and microeconomics.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store wanting to buy either a coffee cup commemorating Thor Heyerdahl's Pacific crossing aboard the Kon-Tiki or a rechargeable battery for your cell phone. Be on the lookout for jovial bank tellers.
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There were no banks in colonial America before the U.S. Revolutionary War. Anyone seeking a loan did so from another individual.
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