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IMPLEMENTATION LAG: In the context of economic policies, the time between the realization that a shock to the economy has occurred and corrective government action responding to the shock. This is one of several policy lags that limit the effectiveness of stabilization policies designed to correct business-cycle fluctuations. This is also one of two inside lags. The other is a recognition lag. The implementation lag, which is often divided into decision and action lags, emerges due to the time it takes for government leaders to debate, discuss, and decide on the appropriate policy then get the appropriate government agencies to launch the policy. The implementation lag is usually shorter for monetary policy than fiscal policy.

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TOTAL FACTOR COST: The opportunity cost incurred when using a given factor of production to produce a good or service. Total factor cost should be compared with the related term, total cost. Total factor cost is the cost of using a specific factor, total cost is the cost of all factors of production. Total factor cost is predominately used in the analysis of the factor market.

     See also | total cost | opportunity cost | factors of production | factor market | average factor cost | marginal factor cost | factor price | perfect competition | imperfect competition | monopsony | market control |


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TOTAL FACTOR COST, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2024. [Accessed: March 5, 2024].


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INDETERMINANT

The directional change in a variable, resulting from the disruption of an equilibrium that is identified using comparative statics, is not known. This term is commonly used to indicate that the change in either price or quantity is unknown when the market experiences simultaneous shifts in both the demand and supply curves. For example, an increase in both demand and supply definitely cause an increase in the quantity exchanged. But whether the market price increases or decreases is indeterminant.

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