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April 25, 2018 

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ABSTRACTION: Simplifying the complexities of the real world by ignoring (hopefully) unimportant details while doing economic analysis. Abstraction is often criticized because it's, well, it's JUST NOT REALISTIC. However, when done correctly (ignoring things that JUST DON'T MATTER), then the pursuit of knowledge is greatly enhanced by abstraction. For example, when travelling cross country along a high-speed interstate highway, a paper road map is a handy tool. It shows towns and cities along the way, the major intersections, rest stop locations, and other important points of interest. However, it ignores unimportant details. It doesn't realistically show the location of every tree, bush, or blade of grass. Why bother? This information won't enhance your road trip.

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PERFECT COMPETITION: An ideal market structure characterized by a large number of small firms, identical products sold by all firms, freedom of entry into and exit out of the industry, and perfect knowledge of prices and technology. This is one of four basic market structures. The other three are monopoly, oligopoly, and monopolistic competition. Perfect competition is an idealized market structure that's not observed in the real world. While unrealistic, it does provide an excellent benchmark that can be used to analyze real world market structures. In particular, perfect competition efficiently allocates resources.

     See also | market structure | firm | monopoly | oligopoly | monopolistic competition | perfect competition and demand | perfect competition and efficiency | perfect competition characteristics | perfect competition and short-run supply curve | monopoly and perfect competition |


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PERFECT COMPETITION, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: April 25, 2018].


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MARGINAL COST AND MARGINAL PRODUCT

The U-shape of the marginal cost curve is closely related to the hump-shape of the marginal product curve. The increasing portion of the marginal product curve corresponds with the decreasing portion of the marginal cost curve. The decreasing portion of the marginal product curve corresponds with the increasing portion of the marginal cost curve. The peak of the marginal product curve corresponds with the minimum of the marginal cost curve.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a going out of business sale looking to buy either a T-shirt commemorating the 2000 Olympics or a genuine fake plastic Tiffany lamp. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
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In the Middle Ages, pepper was used for bartering, and it was often more valuable and stable in value than gold.
"The greatest things ever done on Earth have been done little by little. "

-- William Jennings Bryan

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