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January 17, 2018 

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JUST PRICE: A somewhat archaic term developed by St. Thomas Aquinas that the price of a good should equal the worth generally agreed to by society. This is based on a notion of justice and fairness that goods should only be exchange for something of equal value or worth. For example, if ice cream readily sells for a dollar a scoop throughout the city, but one vendor charges two dollars, then this higher price would not be considered a just price. This view of a just price is relies on the view that each good has an intrinsic value which is inconsistent with modern views of markets, prices, and subjective values.

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BARTER: A method of trading goods, commodities, or services, directly for one another without the use of money. In a barter exchange one good is traded directly for another. This sort of exchange ultimately requires a double coincidence of wants, meaning that each trader has what the other trader wants and wants what the other has. Without a double coincidence of wants the exchange process can become exceedingly complex, requiring a great deal of resources to complete transactions, resources that can not be used for production. In fact, inefficient barter trading was the primary reason that money was invented. With money, more resources can be used for production and fewer are needed for trading.

     See also | good | service | money | exchange | double coincidence of wants | resources | production | market |


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BARTER, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: January 17, 2018].


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IMPLICIT LOGROLLING

The trading of votes to ensure a favorable outcome for two or more separate decisions undertaken by combined both decisions into a single vote. Commonly practiced in legislative bodies, implicit logrolling occurs when two separate programs or policies are combined into a single package, which is then subject to a single vote. The contrast is with explicit logrolling in which each of two voters agree to cast separate votes for two separate programs. Whether implicit or explicit, logrolling is generally used when neither decision is able to obtain the necessary majority of the votes needed for passage on their own accord.

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