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March 26, 2017 

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FEDERAL RESERVE DEPOSITS: Deposits that commercial banks keep with the Federal Reserve System. Federal Reserve deposits, together with vault cash are the bank reserves that banks use to back up customers' deposits and otherwise conduct daily transactions, such as processing checks and satisfying customers cash withdrawals. Federal Reserve deposits play three key roles in the banking system. One, they are used by the Federal Reserve system to process of clear checks. Two, they are loaned between commercial banks through the federal funds market. Three, they are used by the Federal Reserve System to control the money supply.

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DOUBLE COINCIDENCE OF WANTS: The requirements of a barter exchange that each trader has want the other wants and wants what the other has. Because everyone doesn't necessarily want everything, the lack of double coincidence of wants is a major obstacle in barter exchanges, especially for complex, modern economies. While double coincidence of wants is also essential for exchanges involving money, it's such an inherent trait of money we don't think twice about it. By its very nature as a generally accepted medium of exchange, everyone WANTS money.

     See also | barter | barter exchange | barter economy | money | money functions | medium of exchange |


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MARGINAL REVENUE, PERFECT COMPETITION

The change in total revenue resulting from a change in the quantity of output sold. Marginal revenue indicates how much extra revenue a perfectly competitive firm receives for selling an extra unit of output. It is found by dividing the change in total revenue by the change in the quantity of output. Marginal revenue is the slope of the total revenue curve and is one of two revenue concepts derived from total revenue. The other is average revenue. To maximize profit, a perfectly competitive firm equates marginal revenue and marginal cost.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time wandering around the shopping mall trying to buy either a how-to book on fine dining or a coffee cup commemorating the first day of winter. Be on the lookout for florescent light bulbs that hum folk songs from the sixties.
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The first "Black Friday" on record, a friday marked by a major financial catastrophe, occurred on September 24, 1869 -- A FRIDAY -- when an attempted cornering of the gold market induced a financial crises and economy-wide depression.
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