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FACTOR MARKETS: Markets used to exchange the services of a factor of production: labor, capital, land , and entrepreneurship. Factor markets, also termed resource markets, exchange the services of factors, NOT the factors themselves. For example, the labor services of workers are exchanged through factor markets NOT the actual workers. Buying and selling the actual workers is not only slavery (which is illegal) it's also the type of exchange that would take place through product markets, not factor markets. More realistically, capital and land are two resources than can be and are legally exchanged through product markets. The services of these resources, however, are exchanged through factor markets. The value of the services exchanged through factor markets each year is measured as national income.

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DOUBLE COINCIDENCE OF WANTS: The requirements of a barter exchange that each trader has want the other wants and wants what the other has. Because everyone doesn't necessarily want everything, the lack of double coincidence of wants is a major obstacle in barter exchanges, especially for complex, modern economies. While double coincidence of wants is also essential for exchanges involving money, it's such an inherent trait of money we don't think twice about it. By its very nature as a generally accepted medium of exchange, everyone WANTS money.

     See also | barter | barter exchange | barter economy | money | money functions | medium of exchange |


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SLOPE, SHORT-RUN AGGREGATE SUPPLY CURVE

The positive slope of the short-run aggregate supply curve, reflecting the direct relation between the price level and real production, results for three primary reasons--inflexible resources, frictional and structural unemployment, and purchasing power imbalances.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time going from convenience store to convenience store seeking to buy either a pleather CD case or a how-to book on fine dining. Be on the lookout for bottles of barbeque sauce that act TOO innocent.
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The average bank teller loses about $250 every year.
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