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August 21, 2014 

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NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL RECOVERY ACT: One of the first acts passed under New Deal program the Roosevelt administration in 1933, it specifically allowed workers to organized into unions and to engage in collective bargaining without interference from firms. This act, going by the acronym NIRA, was declared unconstitutional in 1935, but while in force gave a big boost to labor unions and membership. The National Labor Relations Act was created in 1935 to replace the NIRA.

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DOUBLE COINCIDENCE OF WANTS: The requirements of a barter exchange that each trader has want the other wants and wants what the other has. Because everyone doesn't necessarily want everything, the lack of double coincidence of wants is a major obstacle in barter exchanges, especially for complex, modern economies. While double coincidence of wants is also essential for exchanges involving money, it's such an inherent trait of money we don't think twice about it. By its very nature as a generally accepted medium of exchange, everyone WANTS money.

     See also | barter | barter exchange | barter economy | money | money functions | medium of exchange |


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DOUBLE COINCIDENCE OF WANTS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: August 21, 2014].


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SEASONAL UNEMPLOYMENT

Unemployment attributable to relatively regular and predictable declines in particular industries or occupations over the course of a year, often corresponding with the climatic seasons. Unlike cyclical unemployment, which may or may not occur at any given time, seasonal unemployment is an essential part of many jobs. For example, a regular, run-of-the-mill, department store Santa Clause can count on 11 months of unemployment each year. Seasonal unemployment is one of four unemployment sources. The other three are cyclical unemployment, frictional unemployment, and structural unemployment.

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State of the ECONOMY

Consumer Price Index Urban
July 2014
238.250
Up 0.1% from June 2014 Source: BLS

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BROWN PRAGMATOX
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at the confiscated property police auction hoping to buy either a pair of gray heavy duty boot socks or a 50-foot blue garden hose. Be on the lookout for telephone calls from long-lost relatives.
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This isn't me! What am I?

Post WWI induced hyperinflation in German in the early 1900s raised prices by 726 million times from 1918 to 1923.
"Success is going from failure to failure without a loss of enthusiasm. "

-- Winston Churchill, British statesman

JEP
Journal of Economic Perspectives
A PEDestrian's Guide
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