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December 10, 2018 

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OMO: The abbreviation for open market operations, which is the Federal Reserve System's buying and selling of government securities in an effort to alter bank reserves and subsequently the nation's money supply. These actions, under the direction of the Federal Open Market Committee, are the Fed's number one, most effective, most often used tool of monetary policy. If, for example, the Fed wants to increase the money supply (termed easy money) it buy's government securities. If the Fed chooses to reduce the money supply (called tight money) it sells some government securities.

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MONEY FUNCTIONS: Any item used as money in an economy performs automatically takes on four basic functions: (1) medium of exchange, (2) measure of value, (3) store of value, and (4) standard of deferred payment. While "buying and selling" means that money is THE medium of exchange, by far THE most important function of money, money also performs measure of value, store of value, and standard of deferred payment functions. Measure of value, also termed unit of account, means that prices are stated in terms of money. Store of value means that value, the satisfaction of wants and needs, can be stored over time using money. Standard of deferred payment means that future payments, such as paying off a car loan, are also in terms of the monetary unit.

     See also | money | medium of exchange | measure of value | unit of account | store of value | standard of deferred payment | money characteristics | barter |


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MONEY FUNCTIONS, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: December 10, 2018].


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CONSTANT-COST INDUSTRY

A perfectly competitive industry with a horizontal long-run industry supply curve that results because expansion of the industry causes no change in production cost or resource prices. A constant-cost industry occurs because the entry of new firms, prompted by an increase in demand, does not affect the long-run average cost curve of individual firms, which means the minimum efficient scale of production does not change.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time looking for a downtown retail store seeking to buy either a microwave over that won't burn your popcorn or a T-shirt commemorating the first day of winter. Be on the lookout for spoiled cheese hiding under your bed hatching conspiracies against humanity.
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A U.S. dime has 118 groves around its edge, one fewer than a U.S. quarter.
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