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May 26, 2022 

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FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT: The acquisition of controlling interest in foreign firms and businesses from one country in another country. Abbreviated FDI, foreign direct investment can also take the form of constructing factories, structures and equipment (or any form of physical capital) in foreign soil. FDI does not include foreign investment into the stock markets (portfolio investment). Most economists consider foreign direct investment more useful than portfolio investment since this last one is generally regarded as temporal and can leave the foreign country at the first sign of trouble. FDI on the other hand, is considered more durable and with larger economic (potential) benefits.

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CAPITAL CONSUMPTION ADJUSTMENT: The official item in the National Income and Product Accounts maintained by the Bureau of Economic Analysis that measures the macroeconomy's capital depreciation during a given time period, usually one year. The capital consumption adjustment, which is also commonly termed the capital consumption allowance, both of which conveniently go by the abbreviation of CCA, is subtracted from gross domestic product (GDP) to calculate net domestic product (NDP). The CCA is also subtracted from gross private domestic investment to calculate net private domestic investment.

     See also | National Income and Product Accounts | Bureau of Economic Analysis | depreciation, capital | capital consumption allowance | gross domestic product | net domestic product |


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CAPITAL CONSUMPTION ADJUSTMENT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: May 26, 2022].


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ABILITY-TO-PAY PRINCIPLE

A taxation principle stating that taxes should be based on the ability to pay taxes. The ability-to-pay principle works from the proposition that those who have the greatest income should pay the most taxes. The ability-to-pay principle is the only reasonable way to finance the provision of public goods such as national defense, public health, and environmental quality. This is one of two taxation principles. The other is the benefit principle, which states taxes should be based on the benefits received.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time watching infomercials seeking to buy either a dozen high trajectory optic orange golf balls or a large red and white striped beach towel. Be on the lookout for neighborhood pets, especially belligerent parrots.
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The average length of a "business lunch" is about 36 minutes.
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