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AS: The abbreviaion for aggregate supply, which is the total (or aggregate) real production of final goods and services available in the domestic economy at a range of price levels, during a given time period. Aggregate supply (AS) is one half of the aggregate market analysis; the other half is aggregate demand. Aggregate supply, relates the economy's price level, measured by the GDP price deflator, and aggregate domestic production, measured by real gross domestic product. The aggregate supply relation is generally separated into long-run aggregate supply, in which all prices and wages and flexible and all markets are in equilibrium, and short-run aggregate supply, in which some prices and wage are NOT flexible and some markets are NOT in equilibrium.

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COMPARATIVE STATICS: The technique of comparing the equilibrium resulting from a change in a determinant with the equilibrium prior to the change. Comparative statics is the primary analytical technique used in the study of economics. A popular example of this technique is found in the study of markets. Comparative statics is used to analyze how the equilibrium price and equilibrium quantity are affected by changes in the demand and supply determinants, which are graphically represented by shifts of the respective demand or supply curves.

     See also | equilibrium | ceteris paribus | economic analysis | determinant | market | aggregate market | equilibrium price | equilibrium quantity | demand shock | supply shock | surplus | shortage |


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CAPTURE THEORY OF REGULATION

The notion that a government agency established to regulate an industry for the benefit of society acts instead for the benefit of the industry. In effect, the government agency is "captured" by the industry it is regulating. The capture theory of regulation indicates that government regulator acts as the decision-making "head" of a now monopolized industry. This is achieved by a "rotating door" between the government agency and the industry, with members of the regulating agency being former and future employees of the industry. Rather than promoting efficiency, the regulating agency creates an inefficient allocation of resources.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time surfing the Internet looking to buy either a T-shirt commemorating the second moon landing or a coffee cup commemorating Thor Heyerdahl's Pacific crossing aboard the Kon-Tiki. Be on the lookout for the happiest person in the room.
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In his older years, Andrew Carnegie seldom carried money because he was offended by its sight and touch.
"Use, do not abuse; neither abstinence nor excess ever renders man happy."

-- Voltaire, philosopher

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