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TOTAL FIXED COST: Cost of production that does NOT change with changes in the quantity of output produced by a firm in the short run. Total fixed cost is one part of total cost. The other is total variable cost. At any and all levels of output, fixed cost is the same. It doesn't change. This includes cost that is not dependent on, or unrelated to, production. The best way to identify fixed cost is to produce zero output. Fixed cost is incurred whether or not any output is produced. A cost measure directly related to total fixed cost is average fixed cost.

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DEMAND SHOCK: A disruption of market equilibrium (that is, a market adjustment) caused by a change in a demand determinant and a shift of the demand curve. A demand shock can take one of two forms--an Demand Increase or a Demand Decrease. An increase in demand is seen as a rightward shift of the demand curve and results in an increase in equilibrium quantity and an increase in equilibrium price. A decrease in demand is a leftward shift of the demand curve and results in a decrease in equilibrium quantity and a decrease in equilibrium price.

     See also | market equilibrium | market adjustment | demand | demand curve | demand price | demand determinant | equilibrium quantity | equilibrium price | equilibrium | income | normal good | inferior good | preferences | other prices | substitute-in-consumption | complement-in-consumption | buyers' expectations | number of buyers | demand decrease | demand increase | supply shock |


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DEMAND SHOCK, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: January 24, 2022].


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ELASTICITY DETERMINANTS

Three factors that affect the numerical value of the price elasticity of demand and the price elasticity of supply--availability of substitutes, time period of analysis, and proportion of budget. The price elasticities of demand and/or supply for a good can change if these determinants change. The first two determinants are important to both price elasticity of demand and price elasticity of supply, while the third relates specifically to the price elasticity of demand.

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