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MARGINAL COST CURVE: A curve that graphically represents the relation between marginal cost incurred by a firm in the short-run product of a good or service and the quantity of output produced. This curve is constructed to capture the relation between marginal cost and the level of output, holding other variables, like technology and resource prices, constant. The marginal cost curve is U-shaped. Marginal cost is relatively high at small quantities of output, then as production increases, declines, reaches a minimum value, then rises. This shape of the marginal cost curve is directly attributable to increasing, then decreasing marginal returns (and the law of diminishing marginal returns).

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MARKET ADJUSTMENT: The economic analysis of the changes in market equilibrium caused by changes in the demand determinants and supply determinants. Given the two curves that comprise the market--the demand curve and the supply curve; each of which can increase or decrease; market adjustment comes in eight varieties. Four involve a shift of EITHER the demand curve OR the supply curve. The other four involve a shift of BOTH the demand curve AND the supply curve.

     See also | market | equilibrium | market equilibrium | market disequilibrium | shortage | surplus | demand determinants | supply determinants | demand curve | supply curve | demand increase | demand decrease | supply increase | supply decrease |


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MARKET ADJUSTMENT, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2022. [Accessed: May 26, 2022].


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PERFECT COMPETITION, REALISM

Perfect competition is an idealized market structure that does NOT exist in the real world. While some real world industries might come relatively close to one or two of the four key characteristics of perfect competition, none matches all four sufficiently that they can be declared PERFECTLY competitively. Some industries come close on the large number of small firms and the identical product characteristics. A few industries have relatively good, although not perfect, information about prices and technology. However, almost all industries fall far short of the perfect mobility characteristics.

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