Google
Friday 
August 17, 2018 

AmosWEB means Economics with a Touch of Whimsy!

AmosWEBWEB*pediaGLOSS*aramaECON*worldCLASS*portalQUIZ*tasticPED GuideXtra CrediteTutorA*PLS
LONG-RUN ADJUSTMENT: The combined adjustment of an industry and of each firm in the industry to an equilibrium condition that based on (1) profit maximization when all inputs are variable and (2) the entry and exit of firms. The complete adjustment is undertaken by both perfect competition and monopolistic competition. There are two parts of this adjustment process. One is the adjustment of each firm to the appropriate factory size that maximizes long-run profit. The other is the entry of firms into the industry or exit of firms out of the industry, to eliminated economic profits or economic losses. The end result of this long-run adjustment is different for the two market structures based on the fact that perfect competition has equality between price and marginal revenue, while monopolistic competition does not.

Visit the GLOSS*arama

Most Viewed (Number) Visit the WEB*pedia

MARKET DISEQUILIBRIUM: A state of the market that exists when the opposing forces of demand and supply do not balance out and there is an inherent tendency for change. This should be directly (and immediately) contrasted with the entries on equilibrium and market equilibrium. For the market, disequilibrium is indicated by the existence of either a surplus or a shortage. The inherent tendency to change occurs because a surplus causes the price to decline and a shortage causes the price to rise. So long as market disequilibrium persists, the price will be induced to change.

     See also | market | disequilibrium | market equilibrium | demand | supply | surplus | shortage | price |


Recommended Citation:

MARKET DISEQUILIBRIUM, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2018. [Accessed: August 17, 2018].


AmosWEB Encyclonomic WEB*pedia:

Additional information on this term can be found at:

WEB*pedia: market disequilibrium

Search Again?

Back to the GLOSS*arama

DEMAND DETERMINANTS

Five ceteris paribus factors that affect demand, but which are assumed constant when a demand curve is constructed. They are buyers' income, buyers' preferences, other prices, buyers' expectations, and number of buyers. Changes in the demand determinants cause shifts of the demand curve and disruptions of the market.

Complete Entry | Visit the WEB*pedia


APLS

YELLOW CHIPPEROON
[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time flipping through the yellow pages seeking to buy either a battery-powered, rechargeable vacuum cleaner or a remote controlled World War I bi-plane. Be on the lookout for pencil sharpeners with an attitude.
Your Complete Scope

This isn't me! What am I?

A lump of pure gold the size of a matchbox can be flattened into a sheet the size of a tennis court!
"The work of the individual still remains the spark that moves mankind forward. "

-- Igor Sikorsky, aeronautical engineer

OAPEC
Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries
A PEDestrian's Guide
Xtra Credit
Tell us what you think about AmosWEB. Like what you see? Have suggestions for improvements? Let us know. Click the User Feedback link.

User Feedback



| AmosWEB | WEB*pedia | GLOSS*arama | ECON*world | CLASS*portal | QUIZ*tastic | PED Guide | Xtra Credit | eTutor | A*PLS |
| About Us | Terms of Use | Privacy Statement |

Thanks for visiting AmosWEB
Copyright ©2000-2018 AmosWEB*LLC
Send comments or questions to: WebMaster