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HOT MONEY: Financial capital that quickly moves from one financial asset to another in search of or with expectations of higher interest rates and return. Hot money can move from one bank to another or from one country to another. For banks, hot money usually refers to deposits that exceed FDIC insured limits that bounce around from bank to bank as interest rates change. For countries, hot money refers to financial capital that quickly leaves one country due to exchange rates, interest rate differentials, or economic turmoil, or the threat of war.

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DEMAND: The willingness and ability to buy a range of quantities of a good at a range of prices, during a given time period. Demand is one half of the market exchange process; the other is supply. This demand side of the market draws inspiration from the unlimited wants and needs dimension of the scarcity problem. People desire the goods and services that satisfy our wants and needs. This is the ultimate source of demand.

     See also | price | demand price | quantity demanded | market | exchange | supply | unlimited wants and needs | scarcity | satisfaction | income | demand curve | demand shock | demand determinants | demand space |


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DEMAND, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2020. [Accessed: October 24, 2020].


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TOTAL FACTOR COST, MONOPSONY

The opportunity cost incurred by a monopsony when using a given factor of production to produce a good or service. This is the total cost associated with the use of a particular resource or factor of production--it is the total cost of the factor. For monopsony, the price paid increases with the quantity purchased and total factor cost increases at an increasing rate. Total factor cost is predominately used in the analysis of the factor market. Two derivative factor cost measures are average factor cost and marginal factor cost.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time searching for a specialty store wanting to buy either a square lamp shade with frills along the bottom or an electric coffee pot with automatic shutoff. Be on the lookout for mail order catalogs with hidden messages.
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It's estimated that the U.S. economy has about $20 million of counterfeit currency in circulation, less than 0.001 perecent of the total legal currency.
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