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August 22, 2014 

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WILLINGNESS TO ACCEPT: The price or dollar amount that someone is willing to receive or accept to give up a good or service. Willingness to accept is the source of the supply price of a good. However, unlike supply price, in which sellers are on the spot of actually giving up a good to receive payment, willingness to accept does not require an actual exchange. This concept is important to benefit-cost analysis, welfare economics, and efficiency criteria, especially Kaldor-Hicks efficiency. A related concept is willingness to pay.

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DEMAND: The willingness and ability to buy a range of quantities of a good at a range of prices, during a given time period. Demand is one half of the market exchange process; the other is supply. This demand side of the market draws inspiration from the unlimited wants and needs dimension of the scarcity problem. People desire the goods and services that satisfy our wants and needs. This is the ultimate source of demand.

     See also | price | demand price | quantity demanded | market | exchange | supply | unlimited wants and needs | scarcity | satisfaction | income | demand curve | demand shock | demand determinants | demand space |


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DEMAND, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: August 22, 2014].


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GOLD CERTIFICATES

Paper currency issued and authorized by the U.S. Department of the Treasury that is, in principle, backed up by, and exchangeable for, an equivalent value of gold. Gold certificates were in circulation as a medium of exchange for the U.S. economy during two periods, 1865 to 1922 and 1928 to 1934. A similar form of paper currency is silver certificates.

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