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July 28, 2014 

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FALLACY: A logical error in an argument or evaluation of a policy. The six common fallacies that surface in economic analysis are: false cause, personal attack, division, composition, false authority, and mass appeal. These fallacies are most troublesome because, although false, they seem correct, especially when used by a slick-talking, charismatic person (politician) or when the fallacies support a preconceived notion or fundamental belief.

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SUPPLY: The willingness and ability to sell a range of quantities of a good at a range of prices, during a given time period. Supply is one half of the market exchange process; the other is demand. This supply side of the market is directly connected to the limited resources dimension of the scarcity problem. Folks who have ownership and control over resources (labor, capital, land, and entrepreneurship) use them to produce the goods and services that satisfy other's wants and needs. Ownership and control of resources is the ultimate source of supply.

     See also | price | supply price | quantity supplied | market | exchange | demand | unlimited wants and needs | scarcity | satisfaction | income | supply curve | supply shock | supply determinants | supply space |


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SUPPLY, AmosWEB GLOSS*arama, http://www.AmosWEB.com, AmosWEB LLC, 2000-2014. [Accessed: July 28, 2014].


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KEYNESIAN ECONOMICS

A theory of macroeconomics developed by John Maynard Keynes based on the proposition that aggregate demand is the primary source of business-cycle instability and the most important cause of recessions. Keynesian economics points to discretionary government policies, especially fiscal policy, as the primary means of stabilizing business cycles and tends to be favored by those on the liberal end of the political spectrum. The basic principles of Keynesian economics were developed by Keynes in his book, The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money, published in 1936. This work launched the modern study of macroeconomics and served as a guide for both macroeconomic theory and macroeconomic policies for four decades. Although it fell out of favor in the 1980s, Keynesian principles remain important to modern macroeconomic theories, especially aggregate market (AS-AD) analysis.

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State of the ECONOMY

Federal Discount Rate
June 17, 2014
0.75%
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[What's This?]

Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a flea market looking to buy either a remote controlled sports car with an air spoiler or semi-gloss photo paper that works with your neighbor's printer. Be on the lookout for spoiled cheese hiding under your bed hatching conspiracies against humanity.
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Francis Bacon (1561-1626), a champion of the scientific method, died when he caught a severe cold while attempting to preserve a chicken by filling it with snow.
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