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AGGREGATE PRODUCTION FUNCTION: A relation between the total production of real output for an economy and the amount of labor input. The aggregate production function is comparable to the standard production function used in the microeconomic analysis of firm behavior but is applied to the macroeconomic study of aggregate supply, resource markets, and employment. It is typically assumed to experience diminishing marginal returns, resulting in a decreasing marginal product of labor.

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COMPLEMENT-IN-CONSUMPTION: One of two goods that are consumed together to provide satisfaction -- that is, the goods are used jointly to satisfy wants and needs. A complement good is one of two alternatives falling within the other prices determinant of demand. The other is a substitute good. An increase in the price of one complement good causes a decrease in demand for the other. A complement good has a negative cross price elasticity. When the terms complements or complement goods are used, they typically means complement-in-consumption (compare this with complement-in-production). Examples of complement goods are golf clubs and golf balls; hamburgers and french fries; and cars and gasoline. In each case, the two goods "go together." People seldom use or consume one without the other.

     See also | complement | demand | consumption | demand curve | other prices | demand shock | demand determinants | cross elasticity of demand | complement-in-production |


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AVERAGE FACTOR COST CURVE, MONOPSONY

A curve that graphically represents the relation between average factor cost incurred by a firm for employing an input and the quantity of input used. Because average factor cost is essentially the price of the input, the average factor cost curve is also the supply curve for the input. The average factor cost curve for a firm with no market control is horizontal. The average factor cost curve for a firm with market control is positively sloped.

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