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February 7, 2023 

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RATE OF RETURN: The ratio of the additional annual income or profit generated by an investment to the cost of the investment. Here's a simple example, although the calculations are usually a great deal more involved for actual investments. If the cost of constructing a new factory is $10 million and it gives you an extra $1 million in profit each year, then its rate of return is 10 percent.

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COMPLEMENT-IN-CONSUMPTION: One of two goods that are consumed together to provide satisfaction -- that is, the goods are used jointly to satisfy wants and needs. A complement good is one of two alternatives falling within the other prices determinant of demand. The other is a substitute good. An increase in the price of one complement good causes a decrease in demand for the other. A complement good has a negative cross price elasticity. When the terms complements or complement goods are used, they typically means complement-in-consumption (compare this with complement-in-production). Examples of complement goods are golf clubs and golf balls; hamburgers and french fries; and cars and gasoline. In each case, the two goods "go together." People seldom use or consume one without the other.

     See also | complement | demand | consumption | demand curve | other prices | demand shock | demand determinants | cross elasticity of demand | complement-in-production |


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PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE

The different stages that a product traverses over the course of its life from initial availability (birth) to eventual unavailability (death). The key stages are development, introduction, growth, maturity, saturation, and decline. The product life cycle, represented by an S-shaped curve, is an adaptation of the biological life cycle and is common to the study of marketing. It is also important in the analysis of innovation and economic instability. In addition to biological growth, comparable S-shaped life cycles are found in short-run production of a firm, the growth of a person's income, the acquisition of knowledge, and the development of a civilization.

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Today, you are likely to spend a great deal of time at a crowded estate auction seeking to buy either a printer that works with your stockpile of ink cartridges or income tax software. Be on the lookout for broken fingernail clippers.
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On a typical day, the United States Mint produces over $1 million worth of dimes.
"Everyone's got it in him, if he'll only make up his mind and stick at it. None of us is born with a stop-valve on his powers or with a set limit to his capacities. There's no limit possible to the expansion of each one of us."

-- Charles M. Schwab

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